ADC Noise

13468914

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  • I have found that using the highest 100x magnification setting, it can resolve a lot of detail. It is mainly in current mode, at that point. I wonder if that eliminates some of the noise source. The resistor is almost gone.
  • Way to go, how long did the CO2 last? What did it cost?

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • $1.29 per pound at the grocery store.
  • Heh, that'll be a good compare of prices ...

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • TubularTubular Posts: 3,606
    edited 2018-10-19 - 05:40:11
    $10.36 + $1.04 GST = AU$11.40, for 1kg (2.2 lbs)

    And there was plenty of dry ice in there when I left last night, lid closed, but it had all sublimed by morning.


  • evanhevanh Posts: 7,271
    edited 2018-10-19 - 06:25:47
    I think I've got an actual production source, just down the road, selling to the public for NZ$7.82 per kg, which is $8.99 with GST. https://www.boc.co.nz/shop/en/nz/gases/dry-ice

    EDIT: Converting the US$1.29 * 2.2 / 0.65 exchange = NZ$4.37. So just over double what Chip is paying. :(

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • I just checked. I can get it for $2 / pound close by the house. They will discount on larger quantities.

    I can see it now. We've got boards with a little bin and plenum to guide the cold right where it needs to be. Those boards have the sensors needed too.

    "Low coolant, system clock capped at 250Mhz, plz fill chamber"



    Do not taunt Happy Fun Ball! @opengeekorg ---> Be Excellent To One Another SKYPE = acuity_doug
    Parallax colors simplified: https://forums.parallax.com/discussion/123709/commented-graphics-demo-spin<br>
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnson%E2%80%93Nyquist_noise
    Certainly, there is always noise, we can not omit. But all the semiconductor structures will generate noise, we could influence, optimizing the structures. A task, we can not contribute to.
    As I said above, we balance the charge in a capacitor. The resolution can not be more, then the number of charge quanta, we feed back into the cap. The next question is, what is the deviation in the quanta. As the charge is integrated current over the clock time and the current is voltage over resistance, every fluctuation of voltage or switching time changes the charge. If the sampling rate is a given number of clocks, the deviation is averaged by number of clocks and the standard deviation reduced by square root of that number.
    So it could be interesting to read out the register at very high rate (input and store in array) to have a count value as small as possible, analyse the noise (this will be very noisy) and then average to bring down the sampling rate, what should result in a better noise figure. The square root law should apply. Then, the noise is white noise, otherwise it may be a systematical error which could be corrected.
    But again: I don't recommend to redesign the ADC, as we know what we have, but don't know, what we get. It is like: if we know, that Chip systematically lies to us, we should consider to exchange him. But as this is not the case, we keep him ;-)
    @cgracey : please don't take that to personally ;-)
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • evanhevanh Posts: 7,271
    edited 2018-10-19 - 10:15:55
    ErNa wrote: »
    So it could be interesting to read out the register at very high rate (input and store in array) to have a count value as small as possible, analyse the noise (this will be very noisy) and then average to bring down the sampling rate, what should result in a better noise figure.

    Chip's calibration requires stopping the bitstream accumulator, selecting new voltage source - GIO, restarting the accumulator to get GIO value, same again for VIO, and finally back again to the actual input.

    The problem with this calibration is that repeatedly, which appears to be required, performing it rips a big one into any overall sampling rate.

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • Yes, and that is why I believe, calibration doesn't really make sense. 90% of applications. Most signals are relative, that is, you need to measure the change of a signal. This is the case in voice. Or speed. Or whatever. I just don't have a signal ready, where the absolute value is necessary. And that is adequate for the propeller. Certainly we will not demodulate G5 mobile phone signals. In motor control, ADC's are very fast and very precise. But the current in PWM varies +-5% and is very spiky. Moreover, the torque easily varies by 10% during a fracture of a revolution at constant current. That just means: high precision adcs are typically overengineered. We should not try to compete AnalogDevices or LinearTechnology, there is a reason, why they merged
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • We are working on ways to improve the performance of the thermal drift calibration. I figured you were attempting to help.

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • Is the thermal drift different at different ADCs? I didn't watch in detail. If yes, why not use one adc to determine drift and have the others running continuously.
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • I ran a test last night sweeping 80 to 340 MHz taking 1000 samples on pins 0 to 58.
    I haven't had a chance to look at it closely yet but here they are anyway.
    Melbourne, Australia
  • Really nice work on the output tables Ozprop
  • ErNaErNa Posts: 1,248
    edited 2018-10-19 - 12:45:03
    Could you please explain in a few words, what the values in the rows stand for and how the compensation process, Chip implemented, worked? So I have not to scroll back? The data here in display is the last row (range) and it is definitally periodical..and noisy.
    The next graph shows the original signal, original averaged with neighbours a filtered components about 60 samples period, the blue segment is enlarged above to show the result of filtering more precisely
    902 x 546 - 94K
    900 x 149 - 23K
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • evanhevanh Posts: 7,271
    edited 2018-10-19 - 12:41:51
    Here's the first three clock rates for those 59 pins (GIO avg vs VIO avg XY plot). There's real consistency there ...
    1921 x 1228 - 50K
    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • evanhevanh Posts: 7,271
    edited 2018-10-19 - 12:48:07
    ErNa,
    Values are from 16-bit sampled raw data from each ADC of pins 0-58. Range = VIOavg - GIOavg.

    Here's Chip's post about the calibration method - https://forums.parallax.com/discussion/comment/1449144/#Comment_1449144

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • Evanh, are you finding that the ADC works all the way to 340MHz?
  • evanh wrote: »
    Here's the first three clock rates for those 59 pins (GIO avg vs VIO avg XY plot). There's real consistency there ...

    Can the shapes be replaced by blue, red and yellow pin numbers?
    Formerly known as TonyB
  • Chip,
    I'm just using what Oz and Tubular posts. I'm still on the FPGA.

    Tony,
    Working on that. Have to re-sort the data to make it spreadsheet friendly.

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • Bloody hell, spreadsheet scatter plots have fussy inputs!
    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • If we look to the noise of gio and vio, they are in the same range. The difference is less, that could mean, that gio and vio deviate in the same direction,what again points to a difference in the switching level of the comparator. This behavior is not linked to the clock rate, in the plot above the line bundles show the variation in the clock rate, while the end points of the bundles are related to the counts of an individual pin.The variation in the range reflects the difference, so the behavior is the same. As Chip pointed to: this is just to do instrumentation. Not to measure AC signal, so we can live with this comfortably.
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • Crazy question but has there ever been such a thing as taking alternating samples, one of the inherent noise without the source connected to the pin and the apply some method of bias to the actual signal to remove the noise present at the particular sample. I assume this is not doable but just curious if there is a digital version of noise cancellation.

    Sample noise
    Sample signal
    Apply bias
  • ErNaErNa Posts: 1,248
    edited 2018-10-19 - 15:56:01
    Noise means: difference from sample to sample, if the signal is stabil, and the noise comes from the ADC, it doesn't matter, which signal you measure. But measuring the signal only 50% of the time increases the noise of the signal itself be 1.414..
    In the end: measurement is just to confirm an estimation. So the best way to detect a signal is to correlate the signal over time with what you expect. If the correlation factor is high, you know, that the signal is, what you expect. It's just about confirmation. Event the most ugly noise can't overlay a confirmed signal.
    no reason to reason if you feel feelings: in love with the propeller
  • evanhevanh Posts: 7,271
    edited 2018-10-19 - 17:05:53
    Done. I've chopped off 320 & 340 MHz because there was some odd values in the 320 MHz table.

    EDIT: I've just replaced the files (Pin 58 didn't appear in the key)

    2883 x 1815 - 276K
    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • T Chap wrote: »
    Sample noise
    Sample signal
    Apply bias

    Exactly what the calibration is doing. But has to be done repeatedly to stay calibrated.

    PS: This particular noise is internally generated.

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • ErNa wrote: »
    As Chip pointed to: this is just to do instrumentation. Not to measure AC signal, so we can live with this comfortably.

    It's such a huge drop in sample rate that even instrumentation will be affected by the resulting reduction in filtered bit-depth. Not everything is a thermocouple.

    "... peers into the actual workings of a quantum jump for the first time. The results
    reveal a surprising finding that contradicts Danish physicist Niels Bohr's established view
    —the jumps are neither abrupt nor as random as previously thought."
  • evanh wrote: »
    ErNa wrote: »
    As Chip pointed to: this is just to do instrumentation. Not to measure AC signal, so we can live with this comfortably.

    It's such a huge drop in sample rate that even instrumentation will be affected by the resulting reduction in filtered bit-depth. Not everything is a thermocouple.

    Yes, for instrumentation readings, sample rate is going to be slow. At the other end, it can put out a delta-sigma bitstream at 300MHz that can be analyzed by the Goertzel circuit.
  • cgraceycgracey Posts: 11,267
    edited 2018-10-19 - 18:29:46
    evanh wrote: »
    Done. I've chopped off 320 & 340 MHz because there was some odd values in the 320 MHz table.

    EDIT: I've just replaced the files (Pin 58 didn't appear in the key)

    That looks interesting. What do you make of it?

    I've noticed that the 100x magnification mode, being almost purely current-driven at a ~50mV span, is very reactive. Low-voltage, low-impedance, AC-coupled signals can be resolved especially well, because they don't go through the big ~450k resistor. I wonder how that mode can be practically exploited.
  • jmgjmg Posts: 13,609
    cgracey wrote: »
    Evanh, are you finding that the ADC works all the way to 340MHz?

    This is based on : ozpropdev " I ran a test last night sweeping 80 to 340 MHz taking 1000 samples on pins 0 to 58.
    I haven't had a chance to look at it closely yet but here they are anyway.


    See below comments on 'MHz dependent issues'.
    evanh wrote: »
    Done. I've chopped off 320 & 340 MHz because there was some odd values in the 320 MHz table.
    Can you expand on what 'odd values' means ?
    That may be indicating the MHz is getting too high for some parts of the chip, and not others ?
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