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My First SMD Soldering Attempt — Parallax Forums

My First SMD Soldering Attempt

NWCCTVNWCCTV Posts: 3,629
edited 2013-02-25 07:14 in Robotics
OK, So I got my new Solder Station, I got this kit http://www.appliedinspirations.com/appliedcontent/Projects/SMD-Soldering/SMD_SolderingKIT.html
which looks to be a great starting point. I am about ready to embark on my first SMD soldering experience. Any insight that you pros have I could sure use right about now!!!! I want to do this using only my solder station so please no oven baking advise right now. That will come in due time. I have several solder tips from very fine to fairly large. I think the caps are going to be the hardest as it says to heat them up first but not to touch the terminals, so how am I suppose to heat them? Hot air maybe and use that over the board also?

Comments

  • doggiedocdoggiedoc Posts: 2,226
    edited 2013-02-16 18:29
    Looks like a great kit. Perhaps I should order one too!

    As for the caps, I'm not sure. Pick them up with tweezers from the sides. Do you have hot tweezers on your station?
  • NWCCTVNWCCTV Posts: 3,629
    edited 2013-02-16 21:01
    Do you have hot tweezers on your station?
    No hot tweezers but it has a very small suction element..
  • LeonLeon Posts: 7,620
    edited 2013-02-17 01:42
    You don't need to preheat any parts when soldering them.
  • SRLMSRLM Posts: 5,045
    edited 2013-02-17 17:01
    The easiest way would probably be to hold the part down with fine point tweezers, then place the tip of the solder in the joint between the pad and the part. Still holding the part down, use your iron to melt the solder in place.
  • NWCCTVNWCCTV Posts: 3,629
    edited 2013-02-17 18:11
    SRLM that sounds like a good idea. It looks as though the board already has solder on it. I will be starting this hopefully this week. I have a client Server (Very Large Super Micro Case) that I have been woking on and is in the way right now. As soon as I am done with it I will be starting this.
  • rwgast_logicdesignrwgast_logicdesign Posts: 1,464
    edited 2013-02-17 19:41
    Hey go to raymans site rayslogic.com, he is where i got my usb host PCB, he has a bunch of really good videos teaching you to hand solder sm stuff. The jist is pre tin each pad place the component then solder, pre tinning helps Sooo much...

    Also a tip, when Im having trouble keeping an IC or something in place, due to pitch size, I dab the bottom with super glue, line it up wait a few minutes then solder. Make sure to practice aligning it on the pads a few times before using glue though.
  • rwgast_logicdesignrwgast_logicdesign Posts: 1,464
    edited 2013-02-17 19:42
    If theres no limks on his site to the vids just search youtube for rayman...
  • NWCCTVNWCCTV Posts: 3,629
    edited 2013-02-18 18:00
    Searching for rayman brings up everything BUT what I am looking for!!!! Kind of strange. I thought soemone had posted some info about rayman and links to his threads but it is gone! Maybe I was dreaming but it also mentioned the fact about tining!

    EDIT: I found it on raymans site. Looks too easy!
  • Clock LoopClock Loop Posts: 2,068
    edited 2013-02-23 13:04
    Soon enough you will be soldering smt, 0xDEADBUG style.

    No pcb, magnet wire. This was done using precision tweezers (fine point kind can be found in the female beauty section) (they are so fine they are sharp like a needle)
    Precision point needle nose pliers.
    Precision point temperature controlled solering station. (Sodr-tek) is a good brand.
    Proper tip tinner, AND sponge cleaner.
    And fine solder with some real Pb (or even a better solder that has Ag in it? Ive never worked with high silver content solder..)
    I don't need a magnifying device to do this, but I would prefer one.
    Makes it much faster.
    I built 48 of these with no magnifier.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=99507&d=1361653460
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  • doggiedocdoggiedoc Posts: 2,226
    edited 2013-02-23 13:16
    Clock Loop wrote: »
    Soon enough you will be soldering smt, 0xDEADBUG style.

    No pcb, magnet wire. This was done using precision tweezers (fine point kind can be found in the female beauty section)
    Precision point needle nose pliers.
    Precision point temperature controlled solering station. (Sodr-tek) is a good brand.
    Proper tip tinner, AND sponge cleaner.
    And fine solder with some real Pb in it.
    I don't need a magnifying device to do this, but I would prefer one.
    Makes it much faster.
    I built 48 of these with no magnifier.

    Wow! Just WOW!
  • Mark_TMark_T Posts: 1,981
    edited 2013-02-23 15:14
    Wow - but 48? Surely there's a point before 48 units where its easier to go to the bother of a proper PCB? Or at least get a magnifier(!)
  • NWCCTVNWCCTV Posts: 3,629
    edited 2013-02-23 15:30
    Nice work!!! I started last week on the first square. It did not work. Something was amiss so I went on to the second one. I got the 2 LED's to light up but they were not flashing. After testing all the probes I figured out it had something to do with the first square. So, following the instructions I cut it off. Well, that made only one LED light up on the second board!!! Must have cut it wrong or something. Any how, will try again this next week as time provides. It is time consuming and I do not see myself doing this a whole lot, but at least I will have the jist of it by the time I get through all the squares!!!!
  • doggiedocdoggiedoc Posts: 2,226
    edited 2013-02-23 15:38
    Mark_T wrote: »
    Wow - but 48? Surely there's a point before 48 units where its easier to go to the bother of a proper PCB? Or at least get a magnifier(!)
    I'll find his link but I think Clock Loop's project has tight space restrictions and dictates dead bug style.
  • shimniokshimniok Posts: 177
    edited 2013-02-23 21:29
    Tweezers are a must. Flux pen is a must too. I've done dozens of boards with an iron. What worked best for me was to use the tweezers to hold down the passive, put some solder on the tip, then touch it down to the part/pad. Then put the solder down on the other side, and squeeze it down onto the pad/part with the iron tip while pulling away the solder so you only put a little on. If you don't hold down the passives, they will tombstone (stand straight on end). SOICs I usually do one pin at a time. What works for me is to hold the solder on the pin/pad and squeeze it down the the iron, pull away solder. For the finer pitch stuff I usually load on the flux, put down some solder and sweep it across the pins, add more as needed, look carefully for solder bridges. Either remove with wick or sweep along the length of the pins if possible.
  • Clock LoopClock Loop Posts: 2,068
    edited 2013-02-24 12:45
    doggiedoc wrote: »
    I'll find his link but I think Clock Loop's project has tight space restrictions and dictates dead bug style.

    I don't use pcbs or magnifiers because the very little money I have goes into buying prop chips, and the object frame. ( I need more than 48 of them, that is just the minimal.)
    Heres a link http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php/127983-55-Parallax-Propeller-s-Parallells-Processing-of-Permanent-Perturbations./page2
  • WBA ConsultingWBA Consulting Posts: 2,930
    edited 2013-02-24 14:08
  • shimniokshimniok Posts: 177
    edited 2013-02-25 07:14

    Wow, yeah, really good tips there for hot air or iron, various packages, etc. Nice.
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