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The Acrid Smell of Violent Death... — Parallax Forums

The Acrid Smell of Violent Death...

JonnyMacJonnyMac Posts: 7,589
edited 2021-03-25 15:46 in General Discussion

... is even more intense when I -- JonnyMac -- plug a 12v power supply into my namesake PCB and destroy the installed Edge module. I think I'm going to need a whiskey.

Comments

  • Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi) Posts: 22,981
    edited 2021-03-25 02:29

    Bummer!


    I recommend a Manhattan:

    2 parts rye whiskey of your choice
    1 part Martini & Rossi sweet vermouth
    Dash Peychaud's bitters

    Garnish with a couple Maraschino cherries.


    Play Bach's Brandenburg Concertos at full volume. Continue mixing and imbibing until you can't hear them anymore -- or smell the acrid magic smoke.

    -Phil

  • Awe man!

  • Check your PayPal. Sent you a little something to cheer you up and help buy some new gear. :)

  • Oh, the humanity!

  • ColeyColey Posts: 1,040

    @JonnyMac said:
    ... is even more intense when I -- JonnyMac -- plug a 12v power supply into my namesake PCB and destroy the installed Edge module. I think I'm going to need a whiskey.

    There's no shame in that I did exactly the same a few weeks ago ;-)

  • I'm sure this has been discussed elsewhere but I'm too lazy to search and this seems to be an ideal time to discuss: I've been pondering a way to color code my connectors so that I have a visual contrast if I grab the wrong connector. I used to have some Testers model paint that would serve that purpose well. Or maybe wrap the male connector with a color of electrical tape and the same color on the female connector on the board.
    What ideas do you all have?

    Paul

  • What ideas do you all have?

    Colored shrink tubing.

    -Phil

  • JonnyMacJonnyMac Posts: 7,589

    I have two barrel connectors near my workspace: one is 5v, the other is 12v. The 5v connector has a big flag on it now. The funny thing is, I put a "5v" label on the barrel jack of the PCB within moments of it coming out of the package!

  • Colored shrink tubing.

    Good idea.

  • @JonnyMac - I have a multitude of connectors floating around my workspace and so far I guess I have been lucky. Your experience has reminded me that I should color code everything; especially as I am not as young as I used to be.

  • TubularTubular Posts: 4,347

    ATX color coding? Yellow for +12v, Red for +5v?

  • Cluso99Cluso99 Posts: 17,731
    edited 2021-03-26 04:14

    I am paranoid whenever using barrel jacks. Maybe that's why I have nev... (reaches to touch the wooden desk!).

    And then there are the ones using reversed polarity (center negative)

  • ercoerco Posts: 19,925

    Some boards need killin'.

    Killin' a board is a helluva thing.

  • frank freedmanfrank freedman Posts: 1,835
    edited 2021-03-28 06:13

    Mark them; use Dychem Crosscheck.
    https://crosschecknow.com/
    They come in multiple colors. Use red and yellow same colors on PC/HDD power supply connectors. Maybe the orange for +24V etc. They are a bright colors, and there are more than a few selections. I use them on torqued bolts for a fast future visual check. If cracked or missing (this stuff sticks quite well) the bolt has shifted or been tampered with. Or in some cases, a bolt that is required to be removed for maintenance that the material is still present indicates procedure step NOT completed.

  • YanomaniYanomani Posts: 1,168
    edited 2021-03-28 12:45

    Please, remember the orange color is often used to identify +3.3 Vdc (e.g., PC-ATX-class power supply).

    Though I have no experience using that product, reading the datasheet does not clarifies if tacking on plastics like polyethylene or polypropylene would result in a sound adhesion. IMHO, it should be tested to ensure good results.

    https://crosschecknow.com/content/crosschecktds.pdf

  • frank freedmanfrank freedman Posts: 1,835
    edited 2021-03-28 23:30

    @Yanomani said:
    Please, remember the orange color is often used to identify +3.3 Vdc (e.g., PC-ATX-class power supply).

    Though I have no experience using that product, reading the datasheet does not clarifies if tacking on plastics like polyethylene or polypropylene would result in a sound adhesion. IMHO, it should be tested to ensure good results.

    https://crosschecknow.com/content/crosschecktds.pdf

    Missed that one, also can't speak to plastic surfaces, though I could experiment with it at work this week and see how a test lead holds up.

  • YanomaniYanomani Posts: 1,168
    edited 2021-03-28 22:07

    Thank you for bringing such useful marker to the discussion; any update on its usefulness would be appreciated.

    Appart from the most obvious ones, the toughest part will be determining the true composition of any prospective surface.

    Sure it's way better than "tinted nail varnish", the first marker I had access (to my mother's despair), when I started messing with electronics (many decades ago). ;)

  • Tested the Dychem Crosscheck today on a typical jumper wire, square run of the mill. Works great. Just make sure it fully dries prior to use. Should have realized that test was not needed. My main tool boxes are the Dewalt boxes and I have long ago marked them as to content with Dychem crosscheck and 6 years later, still there inspite of day to day use.

  • YanomaniYanomani Posts: 1,168
    edited 2021-03-31 04:23

    Thanks for taking your time to do the testing. Now it's clear that we can rely on it, in order to perform the most useful of marking jobs, as on jumper wires.

    If it can persist during six years, tacked to the outside surfaces of a toolbox, it sure can be considered as undeletable! :lol:

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