P1 from China - good deal with free shipping or fake?

MJBMJB Posts: 1,154
edited 2020-04-07 - 19:38:12 in Propeller 1
just saw this
P8X32A Q44 32-bit Microcontrollers
https://aliexpress.com/item/32354924569.html1

from 2 pieces it is 10.92 Euro or $11.63

DIP Version same price:
https://aliexpress.com/item/4000837690261.html

since it is with free shipping for us here in Europe and maybe other places outside US might be interesting for low volume orders.

BUT - can this be? Does Parallax sell big orders to china so the would appear on ALIExpresss?

Comments

  • Certainly looks legit! The seller appears to be in Australia. I think this is a great idea. :)

    One thing I'll say about AliExpress is that they have kept shipping stuff all thru the CV19 dealio. I've gotten several hundreds of dollars of goods from them in the past two or three months, not including the 3000W SMPS that was shipped just yesterday.
  • It says shipping to Australia 20-41 days when I looked. And price is US$15.50 for one, 25% discount for two.

    Ask Parallax, but if the are legit then they might be buying thru a 3rd party. There is sufficient markup for them to be legit.

    If anyone needs small numbers posted from OZ you can PM me. I only have the QFP version.
  • Be careful. I had cases where chinese dealers refurbished old chips soldered out from scap devices by sandblasting and re-labelling them. Some worked and some not. (in my case those weren't propellers but MOSFET drivers)
  • Wuerfel_21Wuerfel_21 Posts: 681
    edited 2020-04-21 - 16:05:58
    ManAtWork wrote: »
    Be careful. I had cases where chinese dealers refurbished old chips soldered out from scap devices by sandblasting and re-labelling them. Some worked and some not. (in my case those weren't propellers but MOSFET drivers)

    I've seen a video about that at some point - they buy some scrap PCBs and get some underpaid people to heat them up and then slap them against something to make all the chips fall to the floor. Then they clean the chips up and try to flock 'em as new-old-stock. AFAIK it happens mostly with discontinued parts. Sometimes you'll apparently get random mislabeled ICs.
  • We have no way of knowing if these chips are legit or not.

    The laser-etched silkscreen looks official, though.

    Ken Gracey
  • Wuerfel_21 wrote: »
    ManAtWork wrote: »
    Be careful. I had cases where chinese dealers refurbished old chips soldered out from scap devices by sandblasting and re-labelling them. Some worked and some not. (in my case those weren't propellers but MOSFET drivers)

    I've seen a video about that at some point - they buy some scrap PCBs and get some underpaid people to heat them up and then slap them against something to make all the chips fall to the floor. Then they clean the chips up and try to flock 'em as new-old-stock. AFAIK it happens mostly with discontinued parts. Sometimes you'll apparently get random mislabeled ICs.

    Ah, the good old "blow torch to the back and give it a whack" method of chip recovery. Works pretty well but a fair percentage of the chips don't survive the experience.
  • kwinn wrote: »
    Wuerfel_21 wrote: »
    ManAtWork wrote: »
    Be careful. I had cases where chinese dealers refurbished old chips soldered out from scap devices by sandblasting and re-labelling them. Some worked and some not. (in my case those weren't propellers but MOSFET drivers)

    I've seen a video about that at some point - they buy some scrap PCBs and get some underpaid people to heat them up and then slap them against something to make all the chips fall to the floor. Then they clean the chips up and try to flock 'em as new-old-stock. AFAIK it happens mostly with discontinued parts. Sometimes you'll apparently get random mislabeled ICs.

    Ah, the good old "blow torch to the back and give it a whack" method of chip recovery. Works pretty well but a fair percentage of the chips don't survive the experience.

    Add to that that there's a good chance the chips were bad to begin with, given the boards they're whacking had to end up in the trash somehow.
  • When I was in the semiconductor business, I recall customers asking if I can validate that they are buying good product from unauthorized channels. Only once was it obvious from a picture, because they etched "Electrio" instead of "Electric" on the transfer mold.

    More often, grey market components came from decommissioned products, as noted in earlier posts.

    The price showed as $15.50/ea for me also, which is rather unattractive.
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