4000 and 7400 Series Integrated Logic Circuit IC's

Anybody a whiz with these?

Have a couple questions.

They are the building blocks of microcontrollers like the Basic Stamp.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7400_series#Part_numbering


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  • jmgjmg Posts: 11,785
    7400 Series Integrated Logic Circuit IC's They are the building blocks of microcontrollers like the Basic Stamp.

    Err, nope.... There are no 7400 devices inside any normal Basic Stamp.
    Perhaps you meant to say CMOS Logic Gates are the building blocks ?


  • Okay.Let's throw out that statement.

    The Stamp part is using it for inputs to the 7400's.

    SX/PIC might work even better.

    Have some nice little 0's and 1's in the PORT register to match up to truth tables of IC's.


  • Hello!
    Urfff!
    Sorry, that was one of my cats typing on the keyboard.
    Now what was it you wanted to know about? I use them almost exclusively here. And have most of the numbers available.......

    For example it is indeed possible to assign four port numbers, say on the Stamp 1 to talk to a four input logic gate, you'd just code it to enable them according to the same truth table that part uses. And I've done that and do have the T-shirts.

  • Howdy

    One of our cats thinks I'm great because I gave it half and half one morning.

    Then the wife said don't do that.Still have the cat here every morning.

    Excellent about you knowing 7400s!

    Let me look through Radio Shack Learning Lab digital lessons and find first one.

    Don't guarantee there is a 7400 one in there exactly.



  • Oops! It uses 4000 series!

    Then there's something in there about combinational logic and sequential logic.


  • Oops! It uses 4000 series!

    Then there's something in there about combinational logic and sequential logic.

    Okay. CD4000 stuff will work just as well. And there are six times as many logic styles for the CD4000 part numbers as created by RCA. An equal number were made by NSC and Motorola issued them as MC14000 series.

    Above all be careful with the pins.....
  • microcontrolleruser,

    I don't think you realize how much circuitry is packed into that little tiny PIC microcontroller.
    A microcontroller is literally a computer on a chip.

    As an exercise look at the Intel 4004 which was the first microprocessor.
    Before that processors were made from logic chips or discrete parts (transistors, resistors, etc.).

  • Genetix

    Whoa! I think Buck and I are on the same page.

    See logic IC. Connect IC.

    Not launching a Saturn 5 here.


  • GenetixGenetix Posts: 1,261
    edited May 31 Vote Up0Vote Down
    microcontrolleruser,

    This might be what you want then.
    https://eater.net/8bit/

  • Here's the text.

    https://electrical.engineering.unt.edu/sites/default/files/Radio_Shack_Electronics_Learning_Lab_Manual.pdf

    It starts out simpler than IC's.It uses switches.

    So a microcontroller is a long way off.

    The Stamp comes into play down the line.


  • Do be careful with supply voltages. The Radio Shack Lab uses a variety of supply voltages, 4.5V, 6V, and 9V, probably because those are common battery voltages. Most CDxxxx ICs will work fine with those voltages. The Stamp (and other microcontrollers) may work at 4.5V. Most other ICs, particularly those designed for use at 3.3V or even 5V, will be damaged if used at 6V and destroyed if used at 9V.
  • microcontrollerusermicrocontrolleruser Posts: 958
    edited May 31 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Thanks Mike.We have even better plans to fry these IC's!

    NOTE:If you look at the SX/PIC Assembler instruction set you see a lot of the same thing.

    IOR and XOR.

    Then there are some more where you can see the similarities.

    INC and DEC.RRF and RLF.

    'The apple doesn't fall far from the tree.'


  • The PDP-8 (see the Wikipedia article for details) was an early 12-bit computer with a very simple instruction set (to save money ... complicated logic costs more). It had only an AND instruction and a 1's complement (NOT) instruction for logic arithmetic. All other logic operations had to be done with combinations of AND and NOT. Similarly, there were addition and negate instructions and everything else was done just using these.

  • Mike

    If you and Genetix want to talk about building a computer from logic IC's be my guest.

    I will be busy building a Logic Probe off to the side on breadboards.

    Red LED for high green for low.


  • kwinnkwinn Posts: 7,923
    Anybody a whiz with these?

    Have a couple questions.

    They are the building blocks of microcontrollers like the Basic Stamp.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7400_series#Part_numbering

    Don't know if I qualify as a whiz with them, but I certainly knew them well and worked with them extensively in the 70's and 80's. They were the building blocks of the older computers and instruments I worked on. They were also very useful for interfacing the early microprocessors to the memory, peripheral chips, peripheral hardware, and instrumentation.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • Not launching a Saturn 5 here.

    The BS2 could have done that!(might require a memory upgrade, however) I know the Prop1 could!

  • ' knew them well and worked with them extensively in the 70's and 80's'

    That is very hard core of you Kwinn.

    In the real world I better stick it out with learning assembler for the time being.

    Think I will stop using Learning Lab for breadboarding micro's.Don't want to fry it.



  • 'The BS2 could have done that!(might require a memory upgrade,'

    Show me. Put a Saturn 5 in your backyard.

    Then send pic's of cable from Stamp Homework board going out to it.

    Just kidding.The smilies here are very sub standard.



  • Here's Wikipedia article on the 4001.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NOR_gate

    Anybody have some thoughts on it?



  • I will say I like the AND gate.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AND_gate

    It's my little buddy.I understand that.

    The next steps to the 4001.The OR and the negation of OR the NOR will require thought!



  • Anybody have some thoughts on it?

    My thought, what purpose talking about 40+ year old technology on a Parallax forum? There are other forums for that.

    Infernal Machine

  • Let's see.

    I buy a Stamp board from Parallax.

    Are you telling me I can't connect it to 4000 series IC's to learn about them?

    I sure hope not.


  • No problem. Is there a particular question?
    Infernal Machine
  • Mike GreenMike Green Posts: 22,748
    edited June 1 Vote Up0Vote Down
    So how do you propose to use a Stamp board to connect to 4000 series ICs to learn about them? What sort of things do you want to learn? Do you want to somehow display outputs and make inputs available from switches/pushbuttons to show the behavior described in the datasheets? How would using a Stamp be different from just using LEDs and switches? A RadioShack or other logic trainer could do the same.

    So you have an AND gate or a NOR gate or a Flip-Flop. How does the Stamp figure in?

    Publison has asked an important question. This is old technology. There are other forums where the members are very interested in that technology, how it worked, how it was used, how it might be used along with current technology. This is a group of forums about Parallax’s products. How does your interest in these simple CMOS gates fit in? I can imagine exhibits in museums or technology classes. It’s hard to make recommendations without more of a vision

  • ' What sort of things do you want to learn?'

    The transition from AND gate to OR gate for one.

    ' How would using a Stamp be different'

    You can lay 0's and 1' into the PORT register and that was covered earlier.

    About that.

    I need to refresh on how to 'load' Stamp 1 with 0's and 1's.Then see them with Debug.


  • There’s no “transition” from AND gate to OR gate. You just have a device with 2 (or sometimes more) inputs and whose output is the AND (or OR) of its inputs.

    You still haven’t answered how using a Stamp would be different from using switches and LEDs or something else. What’s the purpose / function of the Stamp?

    Is it that you want to avoid using the switches and LEDs and have the Stamp set some of its I/O pins as if there were switches there ... under control of a program you type in to the Stamp Editor and use the DEBUG statement to display the state of other I/O pins as if they were LEDs? That’s a pretty simple program and easy to figure out using examples in “What’s a Microcontroller?” which you can download from Parallax’s website.

  • ' What’s the purpose / function of the Stamp?'

    To trigger the logic IC's.

    What's with the inquisition?

    It's my Stamp I'll use it for whatever I want to thank you.



  • XOR's gates are used to make adders and subtractors in micro's.

    So is it worthwhile to learn this? Gee.I think so!

    Need to go connect up the 4001.


  • microcontrollerusermicrocontrolleruser Posts: 958
    edited June 1 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Here's an answer Mr Green did about loading registers in '07
    he DIRS variable provides another way to affect the input/output status of an I/O pin. You can do most anything with statements like INPUT and LOW/HIGH except change multiple pins with one statement. DIRS and OUTS and their pieces provide for this. The page 84 note is important. That's one reason why I/O pins are initialized to INPUTs on a reset.

    Specifically, you don't need the DIRA assignment for your program

    Good little tidbit in there about DIRA.

    You do the same thing with PINS.Load in a binary value.That will be used to trigger IC's.Plus read output pins with Stamp.

    That is what I was looking for.


  • Mike

    If you and Genetix want to talk about building a computer from logic IC's be my guest.

    I will be busy building a Logic Probe off to the side on breadboards.

    Red LED for high green for low.

    Did that in the late 60's. Back then for about an English pound or two you could buy faulty basic 7400 series ICs. Sometimes it would be a single faulty gate in the pack, sometimes one pin would interfere with the whole set of gates. IIRC there were the basic 7400, 7404, 7474 and a few other simple ones.

    My logic probe used a 7400 using the good gates. Worked wonders for decades but alas it's no longer with us. Put out to pasture with the faster ICs of today.
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