does anyone know what these are called?

MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
edited 2005-01-31 - 04:02:35 in General Discussion
Hello,
I'm in need of another one of these. They seem to be female or male serial connecters, except they're very light weight; andthe wires come out of the back. Does anyone know what they may be called?
1600 x 1200 - 452K
1600 x 1200 - 455K
1600 x 1200 - 440K

Comments

  • Chris SavageChris Savage Parallax Engineering Posts: 14,406
    edited 2005-01-30 - 23:08:15
    9-pin D-Sub connectors, or also called DB9.· I see you have both Male and Female connectors.

    You can find some here:

    http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId=10001&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&categoryId=11006






    ▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔
    Chris Savage

    Knight Designs
    324 West Main Street
    P.O. Box 97
    Montour Falls, NY 14865
    (607) 535-6777

    Business Page:·· http://www.knightdesigns.com
    Personal Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/chris
    Designs Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/designs
    ·
  • MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
    edited 2005-01-30 - 23:18:13
    Thanks Chris. Seems like they're called 'solder cup' connectors.

    Wow, I can't believe you noticed I had both male and female connectors. Nice eye.
  • ForrestForrest Posts: 1,341
    edited 2005-01-30 - 23:59:45
    Those connectors in the pictures are NOT have solder cup connectors. Solder cup connectors would already have the pins pressed into the connector, and you'd solder the wire to the pin.

    The connectors in your picture are wider (front to back) that solder cup connectors - they're designed to accept a crimped pin. The assembly process is you would a pin on each wire and pin is inserted into the back of the connector. Small tangs on the pin lock the pin in place on the connector. In my experience, the crimped connectors are quicker to assemble - and there's no chance of a short because you're not using a soldering iron.
  • Paul BakerPaul Baker Posts: 6,351
    edited 2005-01-31 - 00:24:57
    Thanks for the link Chris, I was looking for a deep 15 pin dsub hood to make my atmel isp cable which requires a 74series buffer and resistors in the hood assembly.
  • Chris SavageChris Savage Parallax Engineering Posts: 14,406
    edited 2005-01-31 - 02:08:08
    No problem...jameco has tons of stuff...They have the crimp versions, as well as the solder-type D-Sub connectors...And there are a few different hoods available.· I don't know if they still have them all, but over the years I have gotten metal ones, plastic shielded and plastic non-shielded hoods from them.· Some snap-together, some screw together.

    Radio Shack also has these in stock, but they a tad more.· But if you need them in a hurry...And, they have the pin insert/extractor tool for the crimp-pin versions.



    ▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔
    Chris Savage

    Knight Designs
    324 West Main Street
    P.O. Box 97
    Montour Falls, NY 14865
    (607) 535-6777

    Business Page:·· http://www.knightdesigns.com
    Personal Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/chris
    Designs Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/designs
    ·
  • MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
    edited 2005-01-31 - 03:02:49
    Okay, so I'm looking for crimped pin serial connectors.

    Thanks guys!
  • Chris SavageChris Savage Parallax Engineering Posts: 14,406
    edited 2005-01-31 - 03:53:57
    As a correction to my previous post...I mentioned 9-pin D-Sub connectors, which is what they are called.· More accurately 9-Pin D-Subminiature Connectors.· I also referred to them as DB9...

    A user pointed out to me that this is incorrect.· In fact the DB title belongs solely to the 25-pin connector.· In order to not confuse the original poster or anyone, I will simply say that these are probably best referred to as:

    n-pin D-Subminiature Connector, where n is the number of pins.· In some cases it also helps to specify high-density when appropriate.· For example a VGA connector is a high-density 15-Pin D-Sub connector since it fits in the housing of a 9-pin, and bears the same D-lettering as a 9-pin.

    I appreciate the heads up.



    ▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔
    Chris Savage

    Knight Designs
    324 West Main Street
    P.O. Box 97
    Montour Falls, NY 14865
    (607) 535-6777

    Business Page:·· http://www.knightdesigns.com
    Personal Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/chris
    Designs Page:··· http://www.lightlink.com/dream/designs
    ·
  • Fe2o3FishFe2o3Fish Posts: 170
    edited 2005-01-31 - 04:02:35
    FWIW, FYI, IYGARA.... here's there URL for the naming of D-sub miniature connectors:

    http://epl.meei.harvard.edu/Engineering/d-subminiature.html

    But, I'm sure the world will continue to call 'em DB-9's.... smile.gif

    For your inanity,

    ▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔
    -Rusty-
    --
    Rusty Haddock = KD4WLZ = rusty@fe2o3.lonestar.org
    **Out yonder in the Van Alstyne (TX) Metropolitan Area**
    Microsoft is to software what McDonalds is to gourmet cooking
Sign In or Register to comment.