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Thread: Better Boe-Bot IR Distance Measurements (Circuit + Programs)

  1. #1

    Default Better Boe-Bot IR Distance Measurements (Circuit + Programs)

    This circuit below and the attached programs provide distance measurements that are better than the examples in Robotics with the Boe-Bot, Chapter 8.· The measurements split a·one foot (approx) distance into eight zones that are pretty evenly spaced, and there's next to no jitter in the measurements.·

    ····

    The example programs make the distance measurement by placing different resistances in series with the IR LEDs.· The different series resistances are set by manipulating the input/output states of P4, P5, and P6.· In the initialization of the program, P4 to P7 are all set LOW (connected to Vss), but left as inputs with the command OUTB = %0000.· After that, the program manipulates which of those pins are connected to VSS and which of them are inputs with by setting DIRB equal to different values.· For example, DIRB = %0101 sets P6 and P4 to outputs, but leaves P5 an input.· Since·earlier in the program, the OUTB was set to %0000, any I/O pin that gets changed to an output will send the·LOW signal.· If DIRB = %0001,·that makes P6 and P5 inputs, but P4 is·output-low.· That means·P4 is connected·to Vss.· Whenever anything is connected to Vss, it is commonly referred to as connected to ground, or "grounded".·

    The example programs use FOR DIRB = 1 to 7...NEXT to take P4, P5, and P6 through the following input/output combinations: %0001, %0010, %0011, %0100, %0101, %0110, %0111.· Each different OUTB setting causes different combinations of parallel resistors to be in series with the IR LEDs.· The thing about different parallel combinations of resistors is that they provide different levels of series resistance with the IR LEDs.··From·Robotics with the Boe-Bot, Chapter 7, Activity #3, we know that different series resistances equate·to different IR LED headlight brightnesses.··The brighter the IR LED, the further·the IR·receiver·can see to detect an object.· Inside the FOR...NEXT loop, the code counts the number of detections each side saw, and equates that to a distance.

    Here is the equation for calculating the equivalent resistance of one or more parallel resistors:

    · Req = (R1-1 + R2-1 + R3-1 + ... + RN-1)-1

    Here is another form of the same equation:

    · Req = 1 / (1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + ... + 1/RN)

    Let's say DIRB = %0111.· That means that all three resistors are connected to Vss and are part of the circuit.· To calculate the equivalent resistance in series with the IR LED, it's:

    · Req = 1 / (1/2000 + 1/4700 + 1/10000) = 1230 ohms

    Here's another example with DIRB = %0101.· With this, configuration, P6 and P4 are grounded, but P5 is an input.· So the 4.7 k resistor is not part of the circuit, and we only want to calculate the parallel resistance for the 10 k and 2 k resistors.· The notation for parallel resistance is R1 || R2, etc.· So, this calculation is for 2 k || 10 k:

    · Req·= 1 / (1/2000 + 1/10000) = 1667 ohms.

    The different·series resistances you can get from the seven different combinations of OUTB are: 1230, 1402, 1667, 2000, 3197, 4700, and 10,000.

    Both programs below are also attached to this post.

    This example program tests the distance for both IR Detectors and displays it in the Debug Terminal.· You should be able to get values from 0 to 7, wich corresponds to between 1 inch and 1 foot.·

    Code:
    ' -----[ Title ]--------------------------------------------------------------
    ' TestDistnaceWithNewCircuit.bs2
    ' Test sensitivity of new IR distance circuit.
     
    ' {$STAMP BS2}                               ' Stamp directive.
    ' {$PBASIC 2.5}                              ' PBASIC directive.
     
    ' -----[ Variables ]----------------------------------------------------------
    irDetectLeft   VAR     Bit
    irDetectRight  VAR     Bit
    distanceLeft   VAR     Nib
    distanceRight  VAR     Nib
     
    ' -----[ Initialization ]-----------------------------------------------------
    DEBUG CLS, "Left   Right", CR
    OUTB = %0000
     
    ' -----[ Main Routine ]-------------------------------------------------------
    DO
     
      GOSUB Get_Ir_Distances
      DEBUG "  ", DEC1 distanceLeft, "     ", DEC1 distanceRight, CRSRX, 0
      PAUSE 100
     
    LOOP
     
    ' -----[ Subroutine - Get IR Distances ]--------------------------------------
     
    Get_Ir_Distances:
     
      distanceLeft = 0
      distanceRight = 0
     
      FOR DIRB = 1 TO 7
     
        FREQOUT 7,1,38500
        irDetectLeft = IN8
        distanceLeft = distanceLeft + irDetectLeft
        FREQOUT 3,1,38500
        irDetectRight = IN2
        distanceRight = distanceRight + irDetectRight
     
      NEXT
     
      RETURN


    This example program is the following Boe-Bot program from Robotics with the Boe-Bot, Chapter 8, Activity #2.· With this program, the Boe-Bot should be able to lock onto and follow an object with much less jitter.
    ·
    Code:
    ' -----[ Title ]--------------------------------------------------------------
    ' FollowingBoeBotWithNewDistanceCircuit.bs2
    ' Boe-Bot adjusts its position to keep objects it detects in zone 4.
     
    ' {$STAMP BS2}                               ' Stamp directive.
    ' {$PBASIC 2.5}                              ' PBASIC directive.
     
    DEBUG "Program Running!"
     
    ' -----[ Constants ]----------------------------------------------------------
    Kpl            CON     -15
    Kpr            CON     15
    SetPoint       CON     4
    CenterPulse    CON     750
     
    ' -----[ Variables ]----------------------------------------------------------
    irDetectLeft   VAR     Bit
    irDetectRight  VAR     Bit
    distanceLeft   VAR     Nib
    distanceRight  VAR     Nib
    pulseLeft      VAR     Word
    pulseRight     VAR     Word
     
    ' -----[ Initialization ]-----------------------------------------------------
    FREQOUT 4, 2000, 3000
     
    ' -----[ Main Routine ]-------------------------------------------------------
    DO
     
      GOSUB Get_Ir_Distances
     
      ' Calculate proportional output.
      pulseLeft =  SetPoint - distanceLeft  * Kpl + CenterPulse
      pulseRight = SetPoint - distanceRight * Kpr + CenterPulse
     
      GOSUB Send_Pulse
     
    LOOP
     
    ' -----[ Subroutine - Get IR Distances ]--------------------------------------
    Get_Ir_Distances:
     
      distanceLeft = 0
      distanceRight = 0
     
      FOR DIRB = 1 TO 7
     
        FREQOUT 7,1,38500
        irDetectLeft = IN8
        distanceLeft = distanceLeft + irDetectLeft
     
        FREQOUT 3,1,38500
        irDetectRight = IN2
        distanceRight = distanceRight + irDetectRight
     
      NEXT
     
      RETURN
     
    ' -----[ Subroutine - Get Pulse ]---------------------------------------------
    Send_Pulse:
    
      PULSOUT 13,pulseLeft
      PULSOUT 12,pulseRight
      PAUSE 5
      RETURN

    Post Edited By Moderator (Jessica Uelmen (Parallax)) : 8/25/2010 5:55:58 PM GMT
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  2. #2

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    Very cool approach!· I am going to implement it using a DS1804 Solid State Pot (got that idea from Matt Gilliland's Cookbook series!).· I was going to suggest that this is a perfect candidate for you to add to the "Mini Projects" list, but see you already added.· Very much appreciated!!!!

    Steve
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  3. #3

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    Thanks Steve.

    Yes, the digital pot is a great way to further increase the distance resolution. For this particular project, I tried to stick with parts that already come in the Robotics with the Boe-Bot kit. However, those who have both What's a Microcontroller and Robotics with the Boe-Bot kits can use the AD5220 10 k Digital Potentiometer from the What's a Microcontroller kit. Parallax also sells the AD5220 individually for $3.25. Here's the product page link: <http://www.parallax.com/detail.asp?product_id=604-00010>.

    There are three different possible end to end resistances in the DS1804. I would recommend using the 10 k version; it will give you the best resolution.

    I haven't actually posted anything on that yet, and it'll be a while before I get to it. Perhaps you'll have something up before then. Let us know how it goes.

    Regards, Andy

    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 12/8/2005 1:26:49 AM GMT
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  4. #4

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    I liked this much better then the 1 that came with the manual :D
    Thx for this. I will try to add more to the kode, if i find out how everything works.
    I've never realy koded much before But if i make it, i will post the results.
    Again, thx for this 300% better solution.

    Kim, Norway
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  5. #5

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    I think I understand the schematic, but I'm not positive about it. Would it be possible to improve on it some. I'm learning but I'm new at this and don't want to make a mistake. Thanks.
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  6. #6

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    Here is a wiring diagram that I "think" is correct.· It would be a good idea to review Chapter 2, Activity #2 and Appendix C in Robotics with the Boe-Bot before building the circuit.

    For getting used to building circuits from schematics (without the aid of a wiring diagram), start with Appendix D: Breadboarding Rules.· Then, pick a new circuit from the book each day and try drawing the schematic from the wiring diagram, then look at the schematic in the book and reconcile the differences.· For this, it will be important to use the PDF version since it's in color (for resistor color code identification).·

    After working on that for a while, try building circuits from the schematics.· To be on the safe side, draw the schematic from the circuit you have build, and reconcile the two before connecting power.

    Diagram updated 1/23/06, 8:20 PM PST:



    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 1/24/2006 4:21:42 AM GMT
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  7. #7

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    Dave,

    There was an error in the wiring diagram I uploaded yesterday. The right IR detector's output was connected to P0 (with a 220 ohm resistor). According to the schematic, it should have been connected to P2. Also, the IR LED leads labeled "Anodes" should have been labeled "Cathodes".·

    The wiring diagram in the previous post has been updated to reflect these changes.

    Regards, Andy

    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 1/24/2006 4:23:49 AM GMT
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  8. #8

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    Andy,

    As soon as I have a free moment I'll hook this up with a digital pot-

    Ryan

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    Ryan Clarke
    Parallax Tech Support

    RClarke@Parallax.com
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  9. #9

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    Excellent. I just donated a 10 k AD5220 Digital Potentiometer from the What's a Microcontroller Parts Kit to the cause. It'll be on your desk.


    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 1/24/2006 5:10:58 AM GMT
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  10. #10

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    Thank you Mr. Lindsay -- this is a great way to get better IR. I did a version of this with just two pins and two resistors, to make a very accurate HI/LO range IR.

    I made a little web page calculator that lets you plug in resistor values and get the total resistance for selected "on" resistors. Not sure if anyone will find this helpful, but here it is:

    1uffakind.com/robots/resistorLadder.php

    Please feel free to double check my math functions for possible errors! Parallax rocks!

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    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  11. #11

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    Hey, Zoot,

    That looks great! It's a perfect link for this thread too.

    Regards, Andy
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  12. #12

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    Thanks for this. After doing the follower program, I searched the forums for a way to reduce the jitter and found this.

    There is a small error in FollowingBoeBotWithNewDistanceCircuit.bs2

    this code:
    Code:
    ' -----[ Initialization ]-----------------------------------------------------
    FREQOUT 4, 2000, 3000



    should be:
    Code:
    ' -----[ Initialization ]-----------------------------------------------------
    FREQOUT 1, 2000, 3000



    since the wiring diagram shows the piezo speaker connected to pin1, and the piezo speaker cannot use pin4, since it is connected to a resistor.

    The program definitely does reduce jitter quite a bit, but the bot still jitters a fair bit. So I was wondering if there was a way to get it to sit still when it is in the right spot, or is instability in the measured values normal for the IR sensors?
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  13. #13

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    Thanks for posting the correction. There·are a number·of different ways to calm down the jitter.

    The first is by simply averaging a number of measurements. Try taking four or five measurements (and delivering four or five pulses). Keep adding up the measurements, then divide by the number of measurements you took. After that, recalculate the proportional drive that gets applied as you take the next four or five measurements (and deliver the next four or five pulses).

    Another approach that can clean up the motion is with PID control. This one will take a little more work. Here is a link to a tutorial on the PID algorithm:

    PID Control Intro with the BASIC Stamp <http://forums.parallax.com/forums/default.aspx?f=6&m=66982>

    Another option would be to use a better distance sensor. For example, Ping)))Dar could be modified for following: <http://forums.parallax.com/forums/default.aspx?f=6&m=129099>

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    Andy Lindsay

    Education Department
    Parallax, Inc.
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  14. #14

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    I read your post above, and it makes me think a rolling average would work nicely.

    For example

    I would need the following:
    a counter > cntr
    number of measurements to average by > avgNum (let's say 4 for this example)
    an array to keep the measurements in

    then while cntr < avgNum I start filling the array, and average by cntr to decide what to do

    once cntr = avgNum, then I start pushing new measurements into the array, and moving old measurements out of the array,
    this would provide me with a rolling average.

    This is my idea.

    I am also thinking I could just start filling the array and average by avgNum from the begging, and accept a few milliseconds of weirdness while the program goes through the first cycles.

    Anyhow, I have to go to work now, and don't have time to code this. If I get it done tonight, then I will post the code here.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  15. #15

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    I added the averaging into the program, and it really does slow down the jitter, but it doesn't go away. I found that averaging over 4 pulses works ok. When the target does not move, then the bot rocks back and forth like a crazy person, but much slower than the original jitter

    here is the code:

    Code:
    ' added constant
    AvgBy          CON     4
    
    'added VARs
    distLeftArray  VAR     Nib(AvgBy)
    distRightArray VAR     Nib(AvgBy)
    index          VAR     Nib
    avgDistLeft    VAR     Byte
    avgDistRight   VAR     Byte
    
    'in the initialization, I fill the array with the target value, so the bot doesn't move until it has a good average
    FOR index = 0 TO AvgBy - 1
      distLeftArray(index) = SetPoint
      distRightArray(index) = SetPoint
    NEXT
    
    'this is the new main routine
    DO
    
      GOSUB Get_Ir_Distances
      'shuffle older values to higher index in the array
      FOR index = AvgBy - 2 TO 0
        distLeftArray(index + 1) = distLeftArray(index)
        distRightArray(index + 1) = distRightArray(index)
      NEXT
      distLeftArray(0) = distanceLeft
      distRightArray(0) = distanceRight
    
      'calculate rolling average
      avgDistLeft = 0
      avgDistRight = 0
      FOR index = 0 TO AvgBy - 1
        avgDistLeft = avgDistLeft + distLeftArray(index)
        avgDistRight = avgDistRight + distRightArray(index)
      NEXT
      avgDistLeft = avgDistLeft / AvgBy
      avgDistRight = avgDistRight / AvgBy
      ' Calculate proportional output.
    
      pulseLeft =  SetPoint - avgDistLeft  * Kpl + CenterPulse
      pulseRight = SetPoint - avgDistRight * Kpr + CenterPulse
    
      GOSUB Send_Pulse
    
    LOOP



    Anyhow, i hope someone finds this interesting or useful
    You only have to change the value of AvgBy to experiment with different averages. 4 works pretty well, with 10 it just sits there, 5 and 6 work, but are slower to respond.

    Andy,

    thanks for the awesome posts. I have read some of your other ones, and the instructions and diagrams are spectacular. You should work for parallax!

    Post Edited (Evil Axis) : 11/7/2006 1:35:00 AM GMT
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  16. #16

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    After doing the averaging, I carefully read your post about PID control. I haven't tried to integrate the PID algorithms into the program, but it seems that i will never get the bot to sit still when the object it is following stops, since the measurements from the IR pairs are so inaccurate.

    Am I correct in that assumption?

    On the other hand, the PID stuff is really interesting.

    Sorry if I hijacked the thread. I just got really interested in making the jitter go away. Seems that I am banging into the limits of the sensors though.
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

  17. #17

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    Well, attached is a video clip that contrasts P vs. PID with the same noisy sensors.· The first bot is the same old P control example with the Boe-Bot's motion mirroring the noise it's getting from its distance sensors.· The second bot is a PID controlled bot.· Same noisy sensors, much better tracking (both dynamic and static).·

    There's an apple and orange aspect here since the PID bot has a Propeller chip instead of a BASIC Stamp.· However, the Propeller's ability to get 40 distances instead of just 5 from the same sensors only served to make its jitter worse.· With only proportional control, the Bot with the Propeller chip jittered so badly in response to all the distance sensor noise that it would lose sight of the the object it was tracking and wonder off.· So the PID really·did a great job of cleaning up its object following behavior.·

    Although I've never gotten around to writing PID Boe-Bot following code, I'm very confident that it's doable.· With some tuning of the Kp, Ki, and Kd, PID should clean up the Boe-Bot's behavior just as well as the performance on the video clip.· You may even be able to clean it up further by using your current averaging code as an input filter before the PID calculations.·

    Yeah, you're right, we are drifting a little off the topic of this thread.· Well, if you start developing code and have questions or code to post, definitely start a new thread.

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    Andy Lindsay

    Education Department
    Parallax, Inc.

    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 11/7/2006 5:53:47 PM GMT
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  18. #18

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    One other thought. To make the Boe-Bot stay still when the object is not moving, you could add some code that works from the sum instead of the average. An IF...THEN statement can decide whether or not that sum has changed enough to make it worth running the servos.



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    Andy Lindsay

    Education Department
    Parallax, Inc.

    Post Edited (Andy Lindsay (Parallax)) : 11/7/2006 6:16:47 PM GMT
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  19. #19
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    Andy Lindsay (Parallax) said...
    There's an apple and orange aspect here since the PID bot has a Propeller chip instead of a BASIC Stamp.
    Hey, Andy, do you still have that Propeller code laying around? I'd love to try this with my Spin Stamp.

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  20. #20

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    Yes, it's in the PEKbot thread in the Applications section of the Propeller Education Kit Labs thread:

    http://forums.parallax.com/forums/default.aspx?f=25&m=156644

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    Andy Lindsay

    Education Department
    Parallax, Inc.
    Last edited by ForumTools; 09-30-2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Forum Migration

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