prototyping boards

MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
Hello,

What are my options when prototyping? I've heard of breadboards, but I'm looking for boards that I would be able to solder the components onto.

Thanks.

Comments

  • 12 Comments sorted by Date Added Votes
  • Jon WilliamsJon Williams Posts: 6,491
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    They're usually called perfboards -- get the kind with plated-through holes if you can; they're usally better quality.

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    Jon Williams
    Applications Engineer, Parallax
    Dallas Office
  • Chris SavageChris Savage Parallax Engineering Posts: 13,778
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Radio Shack has dozens of "Solder-Ring" boards that are perfect for prototyping when you want to Solder components in place.· I recommend "Sockets" for any ICs.



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    Chris Savage

    Knight Designs
    324 West Main Street
    P.O. Box 97
    Montour Falls, NY 14865
    (607) 535-6777

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    Chris Savage
    Engineering Tech, Parallax Inc.
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  • MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Okay, I just took a look at the boards Parallax offers and came across the Basic-II Carrier Board. Now, it seems like the holes on this board are independent of each other hole, unlike a breadboard which has each row of holes connected to each other.· Now, how would I connect a pin from an IC to one of I/O pins on the stamp? I guess you would have to solder the wire AND the pin to one hole, but that seems pretty difficult.· Like here's a perfboard I came across with two holes per pad:

    http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=455&item=ECS-2&type=store

    This makes more sense to me because you could solder the pin to one hole, and then solder the wire to the hole beside it.
  • Jon WilliamsJon Williams Posts: 6,491
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    The Carrier Board was designed to provide a convenient board in which to program the BASIC Stamp and to add permanent hardware (via soldering). It's no more difficult to use than any other perfboard -- and is nice because the programming connection to the BASIC Stamp is already setup.

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    Jon Williams
    Applications Engineer, Parallax
    Dallas Office
  • BorisBoris Posts: 81
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    2 comments:
    1) There are different perfboards, some have just copper rings around the holes in the board, some have rows of those rings connected together in groups of 3-4, just like on your breadboard.

    2) Try to stay away from RadioShack. That place is EXTREMELY overpriced, especially for cheap small components. If this is not a project that has to be done by tomorrow morning try to order things online. I had my share of frustration with RS, building a project for school, being limited on time and having to run down to RS to buy components at ridiculous prices.

    Ok, im done rambling on now.
  • MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    So say you use the Parallax Carrier Board, and you're trying to connect a pin from an ADC to one of the I/O pins on the stamp, you would have to solder the ADC pin and a connecting wire to the same hole? Would the wire go above the hole or below?
  • Jon WilliamsJon Williams Posts: 6,491
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    That's a matter of style; I tend to put components on the top side of the board, wires on the back.

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    Jon Williams
    Applications Engineer, Parallax
    Dallas Office
  • MatthewMatthew Posts: 200
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    And you just use standard DIP packages for the carrier board?
  • Jon WilliamsJon Williams Posts: 6,491
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Put any of your ICs into sockets. They're cheap, and will prevent you from damaging senstive parts.

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    Jon Williams
    Applications Engineer, Parallax
    Dallas Office
  • Jose I QuinonesJose I Quinones Posts: 3
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Hi Matthew,

    May I recommend the Basic Stamp Project Board from Avayan Electronics? It is a very economical tool (only $29.95) that includes all which you need to put your Basic Stamp module (has space for a BS I and a BS II) in a socket while gaining access to all I/O pins. It also includes programming ports, reset buttons, voltage regulator, etc.

    The link is http://www.avayan.com/Products/BSPB/bspb.html

    JIQ
  • Lee HarkerLee Harker Posts: 104
    edited November 2004 Vote Up0Vote Down
    One trick I use when prototyping small circuits is to put ICs in sockets as already mentioned and also put on sockets for a handful of discreet components. You can fit 8 resistors or capacitors in a 16 pin IC socket. That way if you aren't completely sure about the component values, you can easily tweak your circuit.

    Lee
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