OT Drive Transmission

ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
edited 2000-03-17 - 17:34:00 in Microcontrollers
I think in the end your transmission would wind up being bigger than
the car. I might be wrong here, so folks hop right in and smack me for it,
but the transmissions you saw on those cars is a bit more than a series of
standard trannies. A lot more torque, too! Have you given any thought to
perhaps a sheave arrangement that could be adjusted with a servo? You
aren't dealing with phenomenal amounts of torque there, and you can get all
the ratios in one manageable device.


Original Message
From: Jared Hoylman <jh0794@d...>
To: <basicstamps@egroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2000 3:41 AM
Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] OT Drive Transmission


>
> Hello Stampers,
>
> I am thinking about making a Remote Control "Super" car using a few
> stamps. I was wanting to use a DC motor to drive the car, but I wanted
the
> car to perform very well at low and high speeds, so I am in need of a
> transmission.
> A few years ago I was watching NHRA Today and saw how the Funny Cars
and
> Rails were geared and how the transmission system worked. If I recall
> correctly they used 5 or 6 back to back two speed transmissions. This is
> kinda what I am looking for but in a smaller scale of course.
> My idea was to find (or make) about four clutch driven 2 speed
> transmissions to place back to back to get good low end torque and great
> high end speed. I was wondering if anyone has ever seen things like this
in
> a small scale.
> I was hoping to have them be able to be "shifted" by a lever so that
I
> could hook up a solenoid to each transmission and shift the gears
remotely
> as the car is being driven.
>
> Maybe I am dreaming here, but I figured I would ask to find out.
>
> Thanks,
> Jared Hoylman
>
> Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
> VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/
>
>
>
>
>
> eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/basicstamps
> http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
>
>
>
>

Comments

  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 11:41:00
    Hello Stampers,

    I am thinking about making a Remote Control "Super" car using a few
    stamps. I was wanting to use a DC motor to drive the car, but I wanted the
    car to perform very well at low and high speeds, so I am in need of a
    transmission.
    A few years ago I was watching NHRA Today and saw how the Funny Cars and
    Rails were geared and how the transmission system worked. If I recall
    correctly they used 5 or 6 back to back two speed transmissions. This is
    kinda what I am looking for but in a smaller scale of course.
    My idea was to find (or make) about four clutch driven 2 speed
    transmissions to place back to back to get good low end torque and great
    high end speed. I was wondering if anyone has ever seen things like this in
    a small scale.
    I was hoping to have them be able to be "shifted" by a lever so that I
    could hook up a solenoid to each transmission and shift the gears remotely
    as the car is being driven.

    Maybe I am dreaming here, but I figured I would ask to find out.

    Thanks,
    Jared Hoylman

    Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
    VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 13:23:00
    A solution might be to design a miniature torque converter. I think these
    are used in snowmobiles. They are variable through a pretty good range.
    In do not know the internal workings of one, but I imagine; two parallel
    shafts (one input, one output) with a series of pulleys of increasing
    diameter on each one.
    The largest pulley on one shaft faces the smaller pulley on the other
    shaft. A connecting belt or chain is "derailed" up or down the shafts to
    vary the ratio between the two.

    Bill


    At 03:41 AM 3/15/2000 -0800, you wrote:
    >
    >Hello Stampers,
    >
    > I am thinking about making a Remote Control "Super" car using a few
    >stamps. I was wanting to use a DC motor to drive the car, but I wanted the
    >car to perform very well at low and high speeds, so I am in need of a
    >transmission.
    > A few years ago I was watching NHRA Today and saw how the Funny Cars and
    >Rails were geared and how the transmission system worked. If I recall
    >correctly they used 5 or 6 back to back two speed transmissions. This is
    >kinda what I am looking for but in a smaller scale of course.
    > My idea was to find (or make) about four clutch driven 2 speed
    >transmissions to place back to back to get good low end torque and great
    >high end speed. I was wondering if anyone has ever seen things like this in
    >a small scale.
    > I was hoping to have them be able to be "shifted" by a lever so that I
    >could hook up a solenoid to each transmission and shift the gears remotely
    >as the car is being driven.
    >
    >Maybe I am dreaming here, but I figured I would ask to find out.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Jared Hoylman
    >
    >Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
    >VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/basicstamps
    >http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 14:05:00
    At 08:23 AM 3/15/00 -0500, Bill wrote:

    >A solution might be to design a miniature torque converter. I think these
    >are used in snowmobiles. They are variable through a pretty good range.
    >In do not know the internal workings of one, but I imagine; two parallel
    >shafts (one input, one output) with a series of pulleys of increasing
    >diameter on each one.
    >The largest pulley on one shaft faces the smaller pulley on the other
    >shaft. A connecting belt or chain is "derailed" up or down the shafts to
    >vary the ratio between the two.

    Close. It's actually sort of two 'cones' that are driven closer together
    (larger diameter) or further apart (smaller diameter) centrifugally (sp?).
    Thus the the belt slides up and down the cones with the throttle...these
    things are brutally ineffecient, consuming *alot* of power just to operate.
    I'm wondering why the original poster needs the high speed? Is this for an
    autonomous robot? If it is, the wide speed range won't be neccessary - the
    decision making logic will have it's hands full even at low speeds.

    Best, Duncan
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 14:25:00
    Look in the Hobby catalogs. The Associated Rc 10 (1/10 scale RC) has a 2 speed
    optional transmission but i think it is centrifical. The only manual I know of
    is on a Bigfoot RC truck i have (about 8 years old) which is a 3 speed manual
    (shifted by servo position) but they are kinda hard to find. You might look into
    1/4 scale RC. A friend of mine has a !/4 scale Sprint car and it has a manual
    transmission but i am not sure how many speeds or how it is shifted.

    >>> "Jared Hoylman" <jh0794@d...> 03/15/00 05:41AM >>>

    Hello Stampers,

    I am thinking about making a Remote Control "Super" car using a few
    stamps. I was wanting to use a DC motor to drive the car, but I wanted the
    car to perform very well at low and high speeds, so I am in need of a
    transmission.
    A few years ago I was watching NHRA Today and saw how the Funny Cars and
    Rails were geared and how the transmission system worked. If I recall
    correctly they used 5 or 6 back to back two speed transmissions. This is
    kinda what I am looking for but in a smaller scale of course.
    My idea was to find (or make) about four clutch driven 2 speed
    transmissions to place back to back to get good low end torque and great
    high end speed. I was wondering if anyone has ever seen things like this in
    a small scale.
    I was hoping to have them be able to be "shifted" by a lever so that I
    could hook up a solenoid to each transmission and shift the gears remotely
    as the car is being driven.

    Maybe I am dreaming here, but I figured I would ask to find out.

    Thanks,
    Jared Hoylman

    Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
    VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/




    eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/basicstamps
    http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 20:23:00
    Thanks everyone for the replies.

    I figured size would be an issue here. I figured that I would find out this
    information first because I would have to build the car around the
    drive-train.

    I would like to stay away from belt drives for slippage reasons. I am
    looking for more of a direct drive option for power loss reasons. My
    experience with belt driven torque converters is low power at low speeds.
    You have to really "gun it" to get a nice response.

    I think the sheave arrangement being adjusted by a servo would probably
    work.

    I will definitely look into the hobby catalogs to see if I can find out
    more.

    Duncan asked why I need the speed, for fun. I was just wanting to build an
    RC car with high speed (~60-70 mph - maybe I'm dreaming here, but this is my
    goal) and high power at the low end (without a whole lot of strain on the
    motor). I'll probably have to implement speed sensitive steering, and maybe
    speed sensitive suspension. Just sounds like a fun project to me.

    Thanks again for all the suggestions.

    Jared

    Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
    VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 21:21:00
    HI

    Here's something I do know about.. MOTORS..
    got to my web site and read about "why motors need gears"
    http://www.members.home.net/rdoctors/motfaq.html
    hope you find soemthing useful there but if ot feel free to email direct
    ( I am not sure that STAMP readers are that interested in electric motors..?

    From: "Jared Hoylman" <jh0794@d...>
    To: <basicstamps@egroups.com>
    Date sent: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 12:23:33 -0800
    Send reply to: basicstamps@egroups.com
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: OT Drive Transmission

    > Thanks everyone for the replies.
    >
    > I figured size would be an issue here. I figured that I would find out this
    > information first because I would have to build the car around the
    > drive-train.
    >
    > I would like to stay away from belt drives for slippage reasons. I am
    > looking for more of a direct drive option for power loss reasons. My
    > experience with belt driven torque converters is low power at low speeds.
    > You have to really "gun it" to get a nice response.
    >
    > I think the sheave arrangement being adjusted by a servo would probably
    > work.
    >
    > I will definitely look into the hobby catalogs to see if I can find out
    > more.
    >
    > Duncan asked why I need the speed, for fun. I was just wanting to build an
    > RC car with high speed (~60-70 mph - maybe I'm dreaming here, but this is my
    > goal) and high power at the low end (without a whole lot of strain on the
    > motor). I'll probably have to implement speed sensitive steering, and maybe
    > speed sensitive suspension. Just sounds like a fun project to me.
    >
    > Thanks again for all the suggestions.
    >
    > Jared
    >
    > Electrolinx - http://www.geocities.com/electrolinx/
    > VB Overdrive - http://extreme-vb.net/vboverdrive/
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > -- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
    > -- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=basicstamps&m=1
    >
    >


    ron... the motor man...
    Ronald Doctors
    http://www.members.home.net/rdoctors
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-17 - 17:34:00
    <delurk>
    <newbie>

    the robot store- http://www.robotstore.com may have what you're looking for.
    Specifically, the link below may be of use
    http://www.robotstore.com/bin2/hazel.exe?client=42261623&action=serve&item=m
    echanical/gear_kits.html

    In general I'd like to add to all members of this list that it has been an
    extremely educational resource in not only the use of the bs2, but also in
    general electronics as well. Thanks

    Regards,

    Joel Lehman
    joel@r...
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