Optics

ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
edited 2000-03-15 - 10:00:00 in Microcontrollers
Hola,
I am using an IR transmitter and receiver circuit to be placed next to
one another with proper shielding. I would like to use a reflective
device about 15 meters away from their position to reflect the
transmitter IR back to the receiver. Does anyone know of any web pages
that would have information on this?
Thanks,
jesse

Comments

  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-13 - 03:02:00
    silver is a good IR reflector and aluminium is close.
    A coated surface will improve reflection efficiency.
    Special IR coatings are available at great cost.


    Date sent: Sun, 12 Mar 2000 14:52:47 -0600
    From: jbabich@p...
    To: basicstamps@egroups.com
    Send reply to: basicstamps@egroups.com
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Optics

    > Hola,
    > I am using an IR transmitter and receiver circuit to be placed next to
    > one another with proper shielding. I would like to use a reflective
    > device about 15 meters away from their position to reflect the
    > transmitter IR back to the receiver. Does anyone know of any web pages
    > that would have information on this?
    > Thanks,
    > jesse
    >
    >
    >
    > eGroups.com Home: http://www.egroups.com/group/basicstamps/
    > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
    >
    >


    ron... the motor man...
    Ronald Doctors
    http://www.members.home.net/rdoctors
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-14 - 18:49:00
    >I am using an IR transmitter and receiver circuit to be placed next to
    >one another with proper shielding. I would like to use a reflective
    >device about 15 meters away from their position to reflect the
    >transmitter IR back to the receiver. Does anyone know of any web pages
    >that would have information on this?

    Not sure about web pages with details, but reflective safety tape
    (ScotchBrite, etc.) makes a dandy reflector. Light goes in, shoots out
    again at suprisingly high brightness. You lose coherence (they're made to
    scatter light to act as safety reflectors), but they're great for bouncing
    photons around.

    As to availability, you should be able to find some sort of safety tape at
    any hardware store in the universe. Check around the mailboxes, house
    numbers, driveway reflectors, etc. That's where most hardware stores keep
    their safety stuff, in my experience.

    -- Pat

    ______________________________________________________
  • ArchiverArchiver Posts: 46,084
    edited 2000-03-15 - 10:00:00
    Ah, you gave me an idea. Edmund Scientific sells corner cube arrays
    35mm square, that do exactly that. At $35 a pop in single, it's not that
    bad a price. A corner cube reflects any light back the way it came,
    regardless of the orientation of the cube itself. In a nutshell, it's
    three mirrors forming a three sided inside corner. Very powerful and nifty
    device, and used a lot in measurement devices.
    Go to http://www.edsci.com/ to the optics division and ask for a
    catalog. I drool over this catalog every time I get one, and I get one a
    lot! The optics division doesn't have a searchable web site, and it wasn't
    on the scientific side of the house.


    Original Message
    From: patrick innes <pkinnes@h...>
    To: <basicstamps@egroups.com>
    Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2000 10:49 AM
    Subject: [noparse][[/noparse]basicstamps] Re: Optics


    > >I am using an IR transmitter and receiver circuit to be placed next to
    > >one another with proper shielding. I would like to use a reflective
    > >device about 15 meters away from their position to reflect the
    > >transmitter IR back to the receiver. Does anyone know of any web pages
    > >that would have information on this?
    >
    > Not sure about web pages with details, but reflective safety tape
    > (ScotchBrite, etc.) makes a dandy reflector. Light goes in, shoots out
    > again at suprisingly high brightness. You lose coherence (they're made
    to
    > scatter light to act as safety reflectors), but they're great for
    bouncing
    > photons around.
    >
    > As to availability, you should be able to find some sort of safety tape
    at
    > any hardware store in the universe. Check around the mailboxes, house
    > numbers, driveway reflectors, etc. That's where most hardware stores
    keep
    > their safety stuff, in my experience.
    >
    > -- Pat
    >
    > ______________________________________________________
    >
    >
    > -- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
    > -- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=basicstamps&m=1
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