SimpleIDE, orphan???

I needed to install SimpleIDE Linux, I notice that has not been updated, at all. SimpleIDE Raspberry Pi, that looks like it has disappeared, or it is very difficult to find. SimpleIDE Windows, same problem.

Since I like to plan ahead, should I plan to quit using SimpleIDE, for all distributions? Or the better question, what does Parallax plan on supporting? Not everybody wants to get funneled into using BlocklyProp. These are just my concerns for using the Propeller 1.

Since it looks like the Propeller 2 is no longer vaporware, and it might be available for the general masses, within the next six months, what will I use to program that chip? OK, Spin 2, will that be as powerful and convenient to use as SimpleIDE C/C++? I know, the usual answer is, the source code is available, DIY; in my opinion, not a very good marketing response. At a loss, I hope I get some answers.

Ray

Comments

  • Question has been asked many times. No response from Parallax. Current best guess is that they are waiting for rev 2 of P2 to begin the the C/C++ tooling discussions.

    Rest assured that the community will almost certainly put something together to give you an IDE-like experience for P2 development.

    In the meantime, your best bet is to either use the existing SimpleIDE binaries in all their ancient and outdated glory or find another tool (maybe command-line tools, maybe a different language, who knows).
    David
    PropWare: C++ HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) for PropGCC; Robust build system using CMake; Integrated Simple Library, libpropeller, and libPropelleruino (Arduino port); Instructions for Eclipse and JetBrain's CLion; Example projects; Doxygen documentation
    CI Server: https://ci.zemon.name?guest=1
  • I have been using SimpleIDE for years now it works great. While the tool itself has not been updated the libraries that are used by it have been. Without this tool there would be no blockly prop as this is the backend for that tool.

    Mike
  • Rsadeika wrote: »
    Since it looks like the Propeller 2 is no longer vaporware, and it might be available for the general masses, within the next six months, what will I use to program that chip? OK, Spin 2, will that be as powerful and convenient to use as SimpleIDE C/C++? I know, the usual answer is, the source code is available, DIY; in my opinion, not a very good marketing response. At a loss, I hope I get some answers.

    Ray

    For Propeller 2, I am using ersmith's fastspin and its barebones editor spin2gui. I switch to another editor like notepad++ for harder editing. If you unarchive spin2gui then it's basically all you need to get started as it includes the command-line driven fastspin compilers and loader. There's basic, asm, spin, an unofficial spin2, C, and some libraries. If you really know C you could definitely help in debugging it to generate correct code.

    imho Linux code editors for the masses for anything not x86 is always a dead-end because there's no money in it. Linux has such a small but very vocal, extremely intelligent userbase. It'd be one thing if these passionate and super-smart people that use Linux would band together and put their money where their mouth is to develop these kinds of bumper-bowling editors for dummies or education. Basically take the hit to pay or get donations to develop exclusive learning tools with functionally better than available on the lowest-common-denominator Windows platform. But that won't happen. Because then they feel like they're wasting their effort helping out some $$$ private corporation sell hardware.

    As it stands, it's a ton of effort for little to no reward. Reward could even be seeing other people use your creation. But powerusers don't like simplified or limited anything. So you end up with Linux powerusers modifying and tying together whatever set of tools they're already comfortable with, with capabilities well beyond for example SimpleIDE. But being so highly customized to the individual and a userbase of 1 person, those end up severely lacking in the ease-of-use category and usually scores a big fat zero in the documentation and help manual category.

    Other than x86 compilers and command-line driven whatevers, barring some government or rich benevolent benefactor stepping in (which does happen), you're just not going to see nice things on Linux.
  • msrobotsmsrobots Posts: 2,974
    edited 2019-04-20 - 21:18:14
    @whicker,

    not so fast. I am in no way a linux fan, but Microsoft does nice things on Linux. MS Visual Studio Code for example, a cross platform editor, even open source.

    And our @Cluso99 made a extension for it to support Spin/Pasm syntax highlighting and even indention markers for Spin...

    Since a while now MS is embracing Linux, hugging it very hard, rumors say they are hugging the neck, but fact is that MS is working hard on getting MS SQL server running on Linux and same goes for MS office.

    With the Windows Subsystem for Linux they are going into the other direction allowing Linux based Software to run under Windows.

    But generally speaking I agree with your assessment.

    Enjoy!

    Mike
    I am just another Code Monkey.
    A determined coder can write COBOL programs in any language. -- Author unknown.
    Press any key to continue, any other key to quit

    The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this post are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.
  • The RasPi version of SimpleIDE appears to not have been updated since 2016:
    https://parallax.com/downloads/simpleide-software-raspberry-pi-propeller-c

    Same goes for the Linux version
    https://parallax.com/downloads/simpleide-software-linux-propeller-c

    From the ParallaxInc GitHub repo, it seems to correspond to the inactivity
    https://github.com/parallaxinc/SimpleIDE

    OpenSpin seems to have more recent activity though.
    https://github.com/parallaxinc/OpenSpin
  • rosco_pcrosco_pc Posts: 354
    edited 2019-04-21 - 11:57:49
    I personally do not understand the whole emphasis on having a propeller specific IDE or a fastspin specific or a whatever specific IDE. At work I'm forced to use eclipse for working with Java and I do not like that at all

    ANY text editor/IDE that you're comfortable with can be used if you make sure that the underlying tools (PNUT, OpenSpin , propgcc, ....) can be called from the command line. Most of these editors nowadays allow integration of cmdline tools.

    There are several examples around here on the forum that show how "easily" things can be integrated with editors and IDEs that are cross platform. Even MS is going that way with vscode, as @msrobots already indicated. (obviously 'easy 'is in the eye of the beholder :))

    And as a side note, I've been using Linux since about '93 as an user.
    I only run windows on my work PCs where I no longer can install non-approved SW :(
    My kids PC used to run Linux until they 'had' to have MS Office as mandated by school and I was forced to buy a copy of windows and MS Office.
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I am only an egg -- Stranger in a Strange land, Robert A. Heinlein
  • rosco_pc wrote: »
    I personally do not understand the whole emphasis on having a propeller specific IDE or a fastspin specific or a whatever specific IDE. At work I'm forced to use eclipse for working with Java and I do not like that at all

    And as a side note, I've been using Linux since about '93 as an user.
    I only run windows on my work PCs where I no longer can install non-approved SW :(
    My kids PC used to run Linux until they 'had' to have MS Office as mandated by school and I was forced to buy a copy of windows and MS Office.

    I believe it is more of something that was offered and is no longer available but that happens with many devices. As far as the need or want to use an IDE, that is an individual, and perhaps a company desire and some folks just don't want to be bothered with fiddling with tools and want to get on with development. This is important when working in cross development areas and using something like GitHub and Static Analysis tools. Learning to do things command line is not a bad idea though.

    Although off topic, as far as Linux Office is concerned, you could have a look see at LibreOffice. I run this and I am able to move files between Linux running LebreOffice and Windows systems run MS Office.
    https://libreoffice.org/
  • Ok then, I'm genuinely curious.

    Would it be possible to have an installer that bundles Visual Studio Code, the P1 and P2 specific code highlighting, the necessary menu commands, the command-line compilers like fastspin, the propeller loader, and certain help documents and datasheets?
  • sorry was travelling: it should be possible, but would need to be maintained to handle new releases. which is a lot of work.
    It is not that difficult to install vscode yourself, copy the spin plugin and install each tool individually.

    Maybe describing this on a wiki page would be easiest.
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I am only an egg -- Stranger in a Strange land, Robert A. Heinlein
  • I installed SimpleIDE on Linux, this version uses propeller-load, for dealing with the TTY ports. Since I have a Linux version of proploader, this one senses WiFi, how do I get that to work with SimpleIDE Linux version?

    Ray
  • Rsadeika wrote: »
    I installed SimpleIDE on Linux, this version uses propeller-load, for dealing with the TTY ports. Since I have a Linux version of proploader, this one senses WiFi, how do I get that to work with SimpleIDE Linux version?

    Ray
    You will have to check with Parallax and ask them to update the Linux build. They may only have updated the Windows version when they switched to proploader.
  • Since Parallax monitors threads/posts, do I really have to ask. I think Parallax should of done it back when they did it for the Windows version. I guess the answer is, DIY!

    Ray
  • PublisonPublison Posts: 11,072
    edited 2019-04-30 - 23:00:20
    Rsadeika wrote: »
    Since Parallax monitors threads/posts, do I really have to ask. I think Parallax should of done it back when they did it for the Windows version. I guess the answer is, DIY!

    Ray

    Ray, the forums are moderated mostly by forum members, not always Parallax employees. We do our best to bring up issues up with the employees. One suggestion, in the time it takes to create a thread here, one could compose an email to support@parallax.com to see if you can get a quicker answer.
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