DIN Rail mounts

Hello!
For the three development boards I use here, a company DINrPlate has created several different style boards who can be mounted on a standard DIN rail. The boards support the several different style Raspberry Pi boards I have here. They also make one who supports the two type of name branded Arduino boards that I am familiar with. (I don't use the Mega board but I am aware of it.) They also show on the site a NetDuino who I do use on that board. It is an N3 model as it happens.

Does Parallax have any plans to create or support a mounting widget for their different systems?

----
Almost illegible writing on the side of Jabba the Hutt's last known residence, "My fortune is available in a cavern inside Beggar's Canyon. The map is is under a rock near the Sarlac." From a legend reported by someone on Tattooine.

Comments

  • Those are nicely-designed and very functional-looking fixtures. Which of Parallax's products do you think would benefit from DIN mounting like this?

    -Phil
    “Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. -Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  • Those are nicely-designed and very functional-looking fixtures. Which of Parallax's products do you think would benefit from DIN mounting like this?

    -Phil

    Hello!
    Yes they are.
    And an excellent question. I was certainly thinking of the Prop One design. And then the Prop One project board. But then again most of the Prop One boards would be a good fit. Except the Badge. The Flip Chip design would need a board to support it, as would the Mini however. I am as most of here know still supporting the Stamp 2 so I also included that in the mix. This is where reason tends to take a back seat, as I'm not even sure how such a mounting widget could be fabricated.

    For example when I saw an N3 poking out on the one for the A*duino board, I immediately thought of one of my bleeding edge contraptions mounted that way. And again I wasn't sure how to go about mounting the Stamp 2 on its BOE board....

    Prior to seeing that firm's ad in a magazine not too long ago, Mag Pi 71 in fact I associated the DIN Rail with pure industrial stuff, and a company called Phoenix Contact has an amazing product line for it, as do the usual other names.
    ----
    The Tribble hisses and Korax complains. -- well known scene from an equally well known ST:TOS episode.
  • Access to a 3D printer? You could always just print your own setup from one of these things:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/search?q=din+rail

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2659908
    That one looks like a clone of the DINrPlate
  • Access to a 3D printer? You could always just print your own setup from one of these things:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/search?q=din+rail

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2659908
    That one looks like a clone of the DINrPlate

    Hello!
    I agree the second one does look like that.
    At the moment such a printer does not live here though.
  • Buck,
    I was looking through supplier catalogs and came across cheap (USD8) pcb holders that can be used to hold Prop boards.
    The downside is that you are limited to their pcb widths - in this case 71mm or 100mm!
  • I now avoid DIN rail most of the time.

    My new method of mounting components is via neodymium magnetic feet for my standoffs.

    No drilling/tapping required to mount the rail and components are easily relocated.

    Magnets are dirt cheap on AliExpress or Banggood.
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • After reading this post, I decided to use DIN rails for my prototypes because the flat style of laying out modules was taking up too much space.
    I bought some DIN rail brackets off ebay;
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/10PCS-PCB-DIN-35-Rail-Adapter-Circuit-Board-Mounting-Bracket-Holder-Carriers/153431621838?epid=8031085139&hash=item23b93cc0ce:g:5V0AAOSwSMZcytar
    . . and with some fabrication, I can now mount electronic modules (including Prop1) in a vertical card style using ABS or perspex backing "cards".
    Mounting the modules vertically as cards, rather than flat on the rail allows a huge space saving.
    The advantage is that the entire prototype can easily be transferred to an enclosure on its DIN rail ready for field installation.
    This interesting post from Hackaday takes the DIN rail concept to a new level!;
    https://hackaday.com/2019/12/03/the-open-makers-cube-have-hack-will-travel/
  • Great for the panel builder but ever tried to pull a module away for service work? Not fun. I am sticking with my neodymium magnets (pun intended).

    Just looking at the M5Stacks modules (link is a PITA on mobile)... I see that one of their industrial mounts is the exact same neodymium magnet that I use. :smile:
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • Hey Mickster, the DIN system is really mainstream (especially in Europe) and well designed to be safe and easy to use.
    It has a huge user base, and they demand ease of access and easy mounting/demounting.
    Pulling out a DIN module is dead easy.
    Every DIN mounted module should have a demountable end with loop for inserting a screwdriver or similar blade in order to release it.
    The demountable end can be flexible or sometimes spring-loaded.
    Just insert the screwdriver, lever it and out pops the DIN module!
    I have never had a problem, even with cheap ebay DIN accessories.
    Magnets seem fine and I can see some advantages, but how do they behave under vibration/shock?
  • Oh sure, I served 3 years of my apprenticeship, building control panels. We used both the G-rail and the Top-Hat profile.

    Great for working on a bench, just clip the component on and away you go.

    But, in the field, you find yourself up a ladder or laying on a factory floor. Flashlight between your teeth to help locate the release tab, screwdriver in one hand and the other hand pulling on the component. Many times the spring-loaded type bottoms out before it clears the rail and then you have the Phoenix or Weidmuller PCB carriers that are so long that they have two or more clips to release. This is when you start cussing the din-rail sales rep who says "just insert the screwdriver...." and you already have a better idea of where you'd like to "insert" it. :lol:

    I started looking for an alternative to drilling/tapping holes in existing electrical enclosures. I had been masking-off other components to protect them from metal chips. So I grabbed a bunch of inexpensive neodymium magnets, with a countersunk through-hole and put them to the test.

    After four years with zero issues, this is definitely the only method for me.

    I still use Top-Hat rails for terminals but these are also retained by neodymiums.

    No sliding problems and certainly no drop-offs.

    Just this year, I discovered the existence of magnetic cable tie bases. Of course, more expensive than the self adhesive type but even in awkward locations, my retrofit projects look every bit as professional as original equipment because everything is neat and perfectly aligned.

    If it ain't broke, break it anyway. There are always better methods.
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • MicksterMickster Posts: 1,518
    edited 2019-12-04 - 09:40:04
    I guarantee that; once you start using magnets as retainers, you'll not stop looking for applications :lol:
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • OK Mickster, I can see you are pretty passionate about this magnet thing.
    I see you still use the DIN rail for terminals, so it is really a combination of DIN rails and magnets - that was not clear before.
    I can see how this will work for me if I use a ferrous metal breadboard (or ferrous metal enclosures) with magnet-secured vertical card holders for the electronic modules, so I will give it a try and report back.
  • Getting back to the original topic; I have brought this up before.

    For integrators, who don't want to get in to developing every little peripheral...but want to use the Prop, wouldn't it be cool to have a prop-based motherboard for THESE and to be able to use the ready-made INTERFACES.

    I am building a system, based on their own processor but only out of necessity. I need the professional look.
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • Mickster wrote: »
    Oh sure, I served 3 years of my apprenticeship, building control panels. We used both the G-rail and the Top-Hat profile.

    Great for working on a bench, just clip the component on and away you go.

    But, in the field, you find yourself up a ladder or laying on a factory floor. Flashlight between your teeth to help locate the release tab, screwdriver in one hand and the other hand pulling on the component. Many times the spring-loaded type bottoms out before it clears the rail and then you have the Phoenix or Weidmuller PCB carriers that are so long that they have two or more clips to release. This is when you start cussing the din-rail sales rep who says "just insert the screwdriver...." and you already have a better idea of where you'd like to "insert" it. :lol:

    I started looking for an alternative to drilling/tapping holes in existing electrical enclosures. I had been masking-off other components to protect them from metal chips. So I grabbed a bunch of inexpensive neodymium magnets, with a countersunk through-hole and put them to the test.

    After four years with zero issues, this is definitely the only method for me.

    I still use Top-Hat rails for terminals but these are also retained by neodymiums.

    No sliding problems and certainly no drop-offs.

    Just this year, I discovered the existence of magnetic cable tie bases. Of course, more expensive than the self adhesive type but even in awkward locations, my retrofit projects look every bit as professional as original equipment because everything is neat and perfectly aligned.

    If it ain't broke, break it anyway. There are always better methods.

    +1 - Having worked with building automation for a few years I have to agree that DIN rails are not a panacea for mounting components. Must admit that the idea of using neodymium magnets sounds like a much better idea than anything I have come across so far.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • I imagine you folks do realize I brought all of that up for one reason. To describe some of what I do back here. I half expect all of this back then. Now? I don't know. I just don't.

    ----
    Almost illegible writing on the side of Jabba the Hutt's last known residence, "My fortune is available in a cavern inside Beggar's Canyon. The map is is under a rock near the Sarlac." From a legend reported by someone on Tattooine.
  • Them plates are pretty cool alright. The other style where the board is spread out along the rail is rather pointless.
    We have the vastness of the internet and yet billions of people decided to spend most of their time within a horribly designed, fake-news emporium of a website that sucks every possible piece of personal information out of you so it can sell it to others. And they see nothing wrong with that.
  • Mickster

    I have read about your use of magnets before and found it very interesting, but after reviewing this thread, between your comments about magnets and others about DIN, I have a new idea :) Thanks to you and others.
    Just this year, I discovered the existence of magnetic cable tie bases. Of course, more expensive than the self adhesive type but even in awkward locations, my retrofit projects look every bit as professional as original equipment because everything is neat and perfectly aligned.

    Another item of great interest :)
    If it ain't broke, break it anyway. There are always better methods.

    I couldn't agree more :)


    Novel Solutions - http://www.novelsolutionsonline.com/ - Machinery Design • - • Product Development
    "Necessity is the mother of invention." - Author unknown.

  • They have become my little helpers as well.

    Have a little proto-board thing going on for a feature that I didn't anticipate. Not exactly lab conditions, here in the plant but the magnetic feet enable me to hold the PCB rigid while I attack it with my TS80 soldering iron with battery pack...no need to go look for a work-bench :cool:

    3072 x 4096 - 4M
    3072 x 4096 - 5M
    3072 x 4096 - 4M
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • MicksterMickster Posts: 1,518
    edited 2019-12-07 - 13:30:01
    I also need to mount a 1/8" steel plate that I had them laser-cut for me, with pilot holes. This covers a hole, left by the old CNC's CRT. Just hung it up there with guess-what! It is very secure and allows me to get it perfectly aligned before banging the drill through for screws & nuts:

    Edit: Used the "spirit level" of my smartphone to square it up :-D
    4096 x 3072 - 5M
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • Mickster

    Those magnets are huge for that little board! Have you tried smaller magnets? I know that the neodymium magnets hold pretty darn well. Perhaps you need them that big, I wouldn't know, because I have never tried the application :)


    Novel Solutions - http://www.novelsolutionsonline.com/ - Machinery Design • - • Product Development
    "Necessity is the mother of invention." - Author unknown.

  • Pretty much dictated by the hole diameter of the board which tends to be a clearance for M3 screws.
    Magnets are brittle so it's kinda pushing it a bit for a countersunk through hole.
    If you let two magnets snap together, chances are that one will break. Haven't had a breakage with snapping to the steel backplane though.
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • idbruceidbruce Posts: 5,863
    edited 2019-12-08 - 11:17:41
    Mickster

    I know you already have a solution which works well for you, but if you are open to options, experimentation, and a tad more work, this might be a little cleaner look for your boards, but it surely wouldn't have the same holding power :)

    Since you are already using standoffs, they could be machined (drilled :) ) to accept a common cylindrical neodymium magnet, which could then be epoxied into place.

    If you were set up, it probably wouldn't take much time at all to run off a decent sized batch, and might even save you some money on your current magnet purchases.

    McMaster-Carr has a very wide selection of standoffs, magnets, and epoxies. Take a peek at their magnet selection.

    P.S. - My apologies for the hijack Buck Rogers. Sorry.


    Novel Solutions - http://www.novelsolutionsonline.com/ - Machinery Design • - • Product Development
    "Necessity is the mother of invention." - Author unknown.

  • Hey Bruce,

    No, this is a one-off. I can't have bare boards in an industrial application. I need to look like the big boys (or better).

    The magnets will be fastened to the base of an enclosure.

    My platform


    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • It's okay Bruce. I already commented on the gigatons of stuff that's come out since I posted the first entries.
  • It's okay Bruce. I already commented on the gigatons of stuff that's come out since I posted the first entries.

    Maybe it's down to the usual cryptic posts but it kinda reads like you object to others contributing to your threads? Maybe others get the humor but it does nothing for me.
    Failure is not an option...it's bundled with the software.
  • Oh?
    I don't object.
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