SimpleIDE source code - couldn't compile

I've downloaded the simpleIDE source from the Parallax Github and when I tried compiling this with the Qt 5.11.2, it gives this error:
-1: error: LNK1117: syntax error in option 'VERSION:IDEVERSION.MINVERSION'

What should I need doing to fully compile it without errors? It looks like these parameters are inside the settings, or I might have missed out something.

Comments

  • 12 Comments sorted by Date Added Votes
  • Knowing a little more about how you got this error would be helpful. What operating system are you running? What operating system are you trying to compile for? What command(s) did you invoke to produce this error?
    David
    PropWare: C++ HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) for PropGCC; Robust build system using CMake; Integrated Simple Library, libpropeller, and libPropelleruino (Arduino port); Instructions for Eclipse and JetBrain's CLion; Example projects; Doxygen documentation
    CI Server: http://david.zemon.name:8111/?guest=1
  • the_yonggrandthe_yonggrand Posts: 9
    edited November 7 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Here are the extra information that leads to the error:
    1.) The compiler is running in Windows 10 64-bit
    2.) Qt 5.11.2 with MSVC 2015 32-bit
    3.) I'm compiling the program as Release
    4.) Trying to compile for Windows 32-bit environment only.
  • Okay, sorry. I don't do any Windows development. Hopefully someone else will chime in. What has you looking at compiling from source?
    David
    PropWare: C++ HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) for PropGCC; Robust build system using CMake; Integrated Simple Library, libpropeller, and libPropelleruino (Arduino port); Instructions for Eclipse and JetBrain's CLion; Example projects; Doxygen documentation
    CI Server: http://david.zemon.name:8111/?guest=1
  • DavidZemon wrote: »
    Okay, sorry. I don't do any Windows development. Hopefully someone else will chime in. What has you looking at compiling from source?

    I'm trying to add the code formatting feature, and also trying to add support for other architecture like esp32. Is it allowed?
  • DavidZemon wrote: »
    Okay, sorry. I don't do any Windows development. Hopefully someone else will chime in. What has you looking at compiling from source?

    I'm trying to add the code formatting feature, and also trying to add support for other architecture like esp32. Is it allowed?

    Allowed? Absolutely. Possible? I suppose in the theoretical sense. Recommended? Not by me. But I'm just some guy on the forums - no one official from Parallax, and not a developer of or contributor to SimpleIDE.
    I think getting the features you want will be easier if you go down a different path. If you're capable of adding auto formatting support and re-writing the build system in SimpleIDE to support a different processor, you are definitely capable of manipulating an existing (more powerful) IDE to do build Propeller applications.
    David
    PropWare: C++ HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) for PropGCC; Robust build system using CMake; Integrated Simple Library, libpropeller, and libPropelleruino (Arduino port); Instructions for Eclipse and JetBrain's CLion; Example projects; Doxygen documentation
    CI Server: http://david.zemon.name:8111/?guest=1
  • I'm sure it's allowed. I forget what license SimpleIDE comes with exactly but I'm sure it allows one to copy, hack and distribute.

    Like David I wonder why?

    If you have the skills to do this kind of thing I feel it would be better used to make something like Visual Studio Code support the Propeller, ESP32, and these new fangled RISC V devices.

  • Yeah, a Language Server would reach far, usable in VS-Code, VS studio, Atom, Eclipse and many other.

    Mike
    I am just another Code Monkey.
    A determined coder can write COBOL programs in any language. -- Author unknown.
    Press any key to continue, any other key to quit

    The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this post are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.
  • Heater. wrote: »
    I'm sure it's allowed. I forget what license SimpleIDE comes with exactly but I'm sure it allows one to copy, hack and distribute.

    Like David I wonder why?

    If you have the skills to do this kind of thing I feel it would be better used to make something like Visual Studio Code support the Propeller, ESP32, and these new fangled RISC V devices.

    I have used visual studio code with all the toolchains and it worked well with all the advanced 32-bit microcontrollers.

    However, I can't redistribute these packages to others - the VSCode doesn't allow that due to legal purposes. I'm trying to make an all in one compiler so that everyone can easily build the program without the hassles of installing the toolchains and such.

    I would start with eclipse, but it looks like it's trashing on many other PC's.

    Therefore, if there's a simple, no-frills IDE which I can include with the toolchains, it would be a nice thing for everyone.
  • I was under the impression that VSCode's binaries and source code were covered under different licensing schemes. The source on Github does state that the source is MIT anyhow. The binary installer from MS has a non-MIT license. Who knows, it's rather confusing. A somewhat interesting thread is at https://opensource.stackexchange.com/questions/4288/is-microsoft-vs-code-really-open-source
  • There are no legal reasons why you can distribute your VS Code plugins how you like.

    VS Code's source is released under the MIT license. Sure Microsoft's actual build of VS Code is licensed differently. No matter.

    Besides your plugin's and such should not require any modification of actual VS Code sources. That's the whole idea behind IDE plug in systems.

    Where do you see an issue?

    I have never been a fan of Eclipse. It always seems big, slow, clunky and complicated.

  • Heater. wrote: »
    There are no legal reasons why you can distribute your VS Code plugins how you like.

    VS Code's source is released under the MIT license. Sure Microsoft's actual build of VS Code is licensed differently. No matter.

    Besides your plugin's and such should not require any modification of actual VS Code sources. That's the whole idea behind IDE plug in systems.

    Where do you see an issue?

    I have never been a fan of Eclipse. It always seems big, slow, clunky and complicated.

    I wouldn't worry if it's a plug-in, but what I'm. building is I have included the entire VSCode binary and the toolchain into a folder for easy installation and deployment. Obviously I couldn't distribute this.

    For many starters in my place, 32-bit systems are troublesome to them due to too many steps just to perform something. By the time they reached "Hello World" example, they have already placed the board back into the box and surrender.

    Many years back it was even worse - there was trouble just to find the "Compile" button on the IDE!

    That's why I'm motivated to have a simpler IDE with all the toolchain, deploy it and then focus more on writing code instead of trying to work around with complicated installation procedures.
  • If you build the binary yourself you can do exactly what you propose. See the stackexchange thread I linked above.

    Mike
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