Vintage Board of Education


Picked up a Stamp Discovery kit that somebody was practically giving away.

This BOE is MADE!

Looks like the old IBM 8086 motherboards and expansion cards.

Ruggedized to survive a nuclear blast!

Even has silk screening on back.

'Try our Stamps in Class tutorials' Then list about 10 of them.

Has other useful info on it too.

That was money well spent!
ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.

Comments

  • 13 Comments sorted by Date Added Votes
  • Picked up a Stamp Discovery kit that somebody was practically giving away.

    This BOE is MADE!

    Looks like the old IBM 8086 motherboards and expansion cards.

    Ruggedized to survive a nuclear blast!

    Even has silk screening on back.

    'Try our Stamps in Class tutorials' Then list about 10 of them.

    Has other useful info on it too.

    That was money well spent!

    Okay now please display photographs.

  • Mr Rogers

    Okay. Well I will fish it out and post the Rev #.

    Little hard to take pictures right now.

    If you have a pressing need I could attempt it.

    Let me know.
    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • microcontrollerusermicrocontrolleruser Posts: 264
    edited August 2 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Buck Rogers

    Rev D

    Has a 28850 on the back.

    It could be the greenest PCB I've ever seen.

    Plus the whitest and clearest silksreening. Easy on the eyes.

    Pretty nice soldering on it too

    Does NOT say Board of Education on it anywhere. Front or back.

    Oops! Yes it does. It's just small and in Chrome lettering! Like leaf on 'Stamps in Class' apple.

    Hope that helps!
    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • GenetixGenetix Posts: 998
    edited August 3 Vote Up0Vote Down
    microcontrolleruser,

    The part number 28850 is for the USB version of the Board of Education and Revision D appears to be the most current.
    https://www.parallax.com/product/28850

    Green has been a standard "solder mask" color on Printed Circuit Boards, or PCBs, for decades.
  • microcontrollerusermicrocontrolleruser Posts: 264
    edited August 5 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Genetix Thx!

    We're saving it as a collectible.

    Don't want to fry it by mistake!

    Will just breadboard a Stamp 1 and 2 DIP.

    Also we don't use the Stamp 1 kit board we have with the SIPP module.

    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • ercoerco Posts: 18,185
    We're saving it as a collectible. Don't want to fry it by mistake!

    What Gus is saying... is that your "collectible" board is brand new and still in production.

    Fry away, Dixieland.
    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso

  • Thanks Erco

    'Sorry Dave. I can't do that'-2001 A Space Odyssey

    Nope. It goes in the collectible box.

    Will just use Homework board.

    No off switch but 'Oh well!'.

    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • microcontrolleruser,

    The Homework board has built-in 220-ohm protection resistors on each of the I/O pins so stick a 220-ohm resistor between the I/O pin and circuit of anything that you hook up to your Board of Education.

    Also, the BASIC Stamp is rugged so unless you are using a high voltage it's unlikely that "The Magic Smoke" will escape.

    Oh, and the BASIC Stamp can easily be replaced on the Board of Education but it's soldered onto the Homework board.

  • Thanks Genetix

    ' Homework board has built-in 220-ohm protection resistors on each of the I/O pins'

    Never noticed that or may have forgotten.

    Okay. On to the next project.

    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • microcontrolleruser,

    On the Homework board those protection resistors are in what's called a Resistor Network which looks like IC similar to a PIC instead of the individual resistors you are probably more familiar with.

  • Thanks Genetix

    Okay. An IC in place of so many separate resistors.

    So it shows up better on the schematic than looking at board.

    Got it.
    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
  • ercoerco Posts: 18,185
    The HWBs I have used all have SMT resistors, which, with careful soldering, can be bypassed for certain applications where the resistor causes problems.

    HWB.png
    600 x 440 - 525K
    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso

  • Thanks Erco

    Okay. So a Stamp on a breadboard has 'clean' pins.

    I will look for those 'hidden' resistors on Stamp1 Project board Propellor Pro board and

    a couple others we have accumulated.

    In the Parallax manuals I think they use the phrase 'protected' by the resistors.

    Never noticed the circuit per se.
    ACCURATE THINKING. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT.
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