BS2-SX PDB product documentation

I had acquired aboard through the generosity of our own Buck Rogers. But I cannot seem to find any information on it. Though I did come up with a schematic from an earlier version.

Power in looks to be 9 volts, if the silk screen is not covered up by a component. That just seemed a little unusual, since there is no range of voltage input.

I am not sure if this is the actual product#, and doc title: 28138-PDB-v2.0.pdf

The board is labeled Professional Development Board Rev C.

Thanks for any help in advance.

Mike
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Comments

  • 32 Comments sorted by Date Added Votes
  • Got a picture?
    Infernal Machine
  • PublisonPublison Posts: 9,559
    edited July 20 Vote Up0Vote Down
    My Rev E Board shows 6-12 volt input.
    Infernal Machine
  • Thanks for the reply Jim.

    I looked over the revision D doc. And it looks like one of the big changes is with the power supply. Instead of a single fixed 9v input, there is a voltage range from 6-12v. Other than that, this will help a lot.

    Thanks again,

    Mike
  • Here's a picture that got left out of the last post.

    BTW: sorry for the flipped Flip.
    2080 x 1168 - 480K
  • Just found my Rev B board, and it calls for 9 volt input, so power supply must have gotten upgraded.
    Infernal Machine
  • MikeDYurMikeDYur Posts: 2,052
    edited July 20 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Publison wrote: »
    Just found my Rev B board, and it calls for 9 volt input, so power supply must have gotten upgraded.

    Maybe something I can do with a regulator swap. My bench has a 12v barrel plug octopus, and I don't need any more clutter.

    EDIT: I'll have to come up with a 9v adapter.
  • MikeDYur wrote: »
    Publison wrote: »
    Just found my Rev B board, and it calls for 9 volt input, so power supply must have gotten upgraded.

    Maybe something I can do with a regulator swap. My bench has a 12v barrel plug octopus, and I don't need any more clutter.

    That's a 5V linear regulator with a heat sink on your board so you should be ok with a 12V input unless the input capacitor rating is 12V or less or you are adding a lot of circuitry to draw more current.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • Your other option is to swap it for a 3 terminal switching regulator.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • Don't forget VSS on that board is 5v not 3.3. The timer, the switches, RS232 level shifter all will make 5 v, need resistors to limit current when used as FLiP inputs.
    Re-inventing the wheel is not a waste of time if, when you are done, you understand why it is round.
    Cool, CA, USA 95614
  • MikeDYurMikeDYur Posts: 2,052
    edited July 20 Vote Up0Vote Down
    kwinn wrote: »
    That's a 5V linear regulator with a heat sink on your board so you should be ok with a 12V input unless the input capacitor rating is 12V or less or you are adding a lot of circuitry to draw more current.

    I'm guessing without looking at a schem, that the 9v supply is important to the microcontrollers.
  • The Rev E has the same regulator with the heatsink. Should be good at 12 volt.
    Infernal Machine
  • Don't forget VSS on that board is 5v not 3.3. The timer, the switches, RS232 level shifter all will make 5 v, need resistors to limit current when used as FLiP inputs.

    I had thought about that, but thanks for the reminder. I can't stand that sinking feeling when you make a mistake like that.

    Mike
  • Don't forget VSS on that board is 5v not 3.3. The timer, the switches, RS232 level shifter all will make 5 v, need resistors to limit current when used as FLiP inputs.

    Good call Tom.
    Infernal Machine
  • MikeDYur wrote: »
    kwinn wrote: »
    That's a 5V linear regulator with a heat sink on your board so you should be ok with a 12V input unless the input capacitor rating is 12V or less or you are adding a lot of circuitry to draw more current.

    I'm guessing without looking at a schem, that the 9v supply is important to the microcontrollers.

    No the regulator just makes 5 volts for everything on the board.


    Infernal Machine
  • Publison wrote: »
    No the regulator just makes 5 volts for everything on the board.




    What was the idea of the specific 9v input?
  • @Publison, Looks like at least the audio amp has a 9v input, If this is the right document. ;)
  • The chip has a wide supply range: 4-12v, so it could be on the 5v bus.
  • PublisonPublison Posts: 9,559
    edited July 20 Vote Up0Vote Down
    MikeDYur wrote: »
    @Publison, Looks like at least the audio amp has a 9v input, If this is the right document. ;)

    LM386 has a wide voltage input:

    http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/lm386.pdf

    So 12 volt input should be OK.

    The VCC on the LM386 takes it's voltage from the input voltage.
    Infernal Machine
  • MikeDYurMikeDYur Posts: 2,052
    edited July 20 Vote Up0Vote Down
    I'm thinking this is a somewhat a heavy duty board, five volts @ five amps, is no small potatoes. Just an awesome board anyway, not only because of the capability of different MCU's.

    Really happy to have one in the collective,
    thanks again Buck.

    BTW: this will be my high current, five volt source from now on.
  • MikeDYur wrote: »
    I'm thinking this is a somewhat a heavy duty board, five volts @ five amps, is no small potatoes. Just an awesome board anyway, not only because of the capability of different MCU's.

    Really happy to have one in the collective,
    thanks again Buck.

    BTW: this will be my high current, five volt source from now on.

    Five amps out? Not likely with a 12V input. That would be 35W dissipation, which is way more than that tiny heat sink can dissipate.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • MikeDYurMikeDYur Posts: 2,052
    edited July 21 Vote Up0Vote Down
    kwinn wrote: »
    Five amps out? Not likely with a 12V input. That would be 35W dissipation, which is way more than that tiny heat sink can dissipate.

    Datasheet for LM-1084 shows a current capability of 5A.

    Though the product doc for the board says 5V @ 1A. I really didn't think that TO-220 case and that heatsink were designed for high current on this board. But I'm am stumped on the choice of regulators. And I'm interested in finding the changes made from version C - D.
  • Even the documentation doesn't jive.

    Revision D documentation says 6-12v input, but the schematic says 9v in.
  • Yes, the data sheet states 5A, but it also states that it is a "low drop out voltage" regulator, and the applications listed for it are either low current or uses where there is a relatively small difference between the input and output voltages. Fine for powering your board with a 12V input as long as you do not add some high current circuitry to the 5V output.
    In science there is no authority. There is only experiment.
    Life is unpredictable. Eat dessert first.
  • kwinn wrote: »
    Yes, the data sheet states 5A, but it also states that it is a "low drop out voltage" regulator, and the applications listed for it are either low current or uses where there is a relatively small difference between the input and output voltages. Fine for powering your board with a 12V input as long as you do not add some high current circuitry to the 5V output.

    I have the board hooked up to a 12 volt switching supply, and is doing fine. The Flip is controlling Emic2 which is conected to the PDB on-board amplifier.

    It must be me but, the amplification never seems to be enough these days. ;)
  • About the only thing I haven't found is what battery is used in the RTC. 3v Lithium, but the size will have to be measured, unless someone has it off the top of their head?

    Also I came across this great Nuts & Volts document on the BS2 PDB.
  • It's a CR2032 battery. Pretty common.
    Infernal Machine
  • MikeDYur wrote: »
    About the only thing I haven't found is what battery is used in the RTC. 3v Lithium, but the size will have to be measured, unless someone has it off the top of their head?

    Also I came across this great Nuts & Volts document on the BS2 PDB.

    That was written by our friend JonnyMac.

    Infernal Machine
  • Publison wrote: »
    It's a CR2032 battery. Pretty common.

    Thanks.
  • I robbed one out of something else, but it Is too big for the holder. Something else that has been changed?
    2080 x 1168 - 358K
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