Free Slurpee Day

From 11 to 7. Sugar up, Buttercup!
"When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

- Pablo Picasso

Comments

  • 5 Comments sorted by Date Added Votes
  • I haven't had a Slurpee since I was a kid (5 or 6 -- so we're talking nearly 50 years) when my grandfather would take my sister and me for a treat. Maybe I should give it another go.
    Jon McPhalen
      *It's "Jon" or "JonnyMac" -- please don't call me "Jonny"
  • ercoerco Posts: 18,327
    I take my girls every year. Go early, as the floor gets stickier from spilled Slurpees as the day goes on.

    Some people are still stuck there from last year, like mice on glue traps. :)
    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso
  • Slurpees give me headaches. I might as well just inject the sugar directly into my veins!

    Hey, Jon ... while back I was trying to show my wife the pictures of the "steering wheel" camera rig you've used, and came across the bio on your page. I didn't know you had studied under one of my favorite actors, Cliff Osmond. What a wonderful experience that must have been.

    I still occasionally rewatch several Billy Wilder movies in my collection, like Kiss Me Stupid. It may not be on everyone's favorite Wilder list, but tops mine. Mr. Osmond's reading opposite Ray Walston is pitch-perfect throughout.
  • JonnyMacJonnyMac Posts: 5,739
    edited July 12 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Slurpees give me headaches. I might as well just inject the sugar directly into my veins!

    Hey, Jon ... while back I was trying to show my wife the pictures of the "steering wheel" camera rig you've used, and came across the bio on your page. I didn't know you had studied under one of my favorite actors, Cliff Osmond. What a wonderful experience that must have been.

    I still occasionally rewatch several Billy Wilder movies in my collection, like Kiss Me Stupid. It may not be on everyone's favorite Wilder list, but tops mine. Mr. Osmond's reading opposite Ray Walston is pitch-perfect throughout.

    I got busy and never made it to 7-11 for the sugar high; probably a good thing.

    The "Fig Rig" -- invented by director Mike Figgis -- is still one of my favorite pieces of kit. The photo is a bit old (I switched to shooting with a DSLR some time ago), but it shows how convenient that rig is. Normally, I use it for moving shots (see the video on my website with Lynda Reynoso). I was shooting some footage with friends where there is an exchange between a man and a woman who is taking a bubble bath. We shot Lauren's POV using the Fig Rig.

    Cliff was more important to me than I can articulate. He started as my teacher. We became friends through our love of acting and writing. Ultimately, he became very much a father figure to me. I am certainly a better actor and writer having studied with Cliff. That said, I think I'm also a better man. I miss him every single day. He was magic. Even when we were working on his book -- and sometimes going to war over word choice -- our sessions always ended with him giving me a hug and kissing me on the top of the head (he was a very tall man). We could fight with each other with the passion of actors because it always came from a place of love.

    The interesting thing about "Kiss Me, Stupid" is that Ray Walston was not originally cast. He replaced Peter Sellers after Peter became ill and could not continue. While filming with Peter, Billy told Cliff (on seeing dailies) that he thought this movie would make him a major star. Things changed with Walston -- nobody on set liked him, nor did he like anybody else and it poisoned the film. After cutting the film Billy told Cliff, "Don't start looking for a bigger house just yet." In all the years I spent with Cliff he disliked Ray Walston for his negative impact on that film.

    If you want to get an idea of how Cliff worked with students, you may enjoy a video series shot by a couple of his students:




    Apologies to Eric for getting a bit off topic.

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    Jon McPhalen
      *It's "Jon" or "JonnyMac" -- please don't call me "Jonny"
  • Jon, Thanks for the background on Cliff. Walston was adequate, I suppose, but perhaps the role would have been best with Jack Lemmon, who I understand (from the wiki page) to be the first consideration. That might have been sweet, given Felicia Farr was his wife in real-life. Sellers was also known as difficult, but as he's a "lady's man" himself, I wonder how that worked against Dean Martin's alpha male part.

    For anyone interested in Kiss Me Stupid, be warned that it's not your typical 60s romantic comedy. Though tame by today's standards, and everything is suggested, it was panned by many mainstream critics as being vulgar. It proved to be a trend-setter in ways, and paved the way to more serious comedy-dramas later in the 60s and 70s. Fans of George and Ira Gershwin will enjoy the humorous take on three of George Gershwin's previously unpublished songs (brother Ira wrote new, light-hearted lyrics).

    Jon, I'll check out Cliff's book. Sounds like a terrific read.
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