Another New Chip, BBC Micro:Bit Go

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  • KeithEKeithE Posts: 761
    edited July 14 Vote Up0Vote Down
    I didn't even notice - their IDE automatically displayed two servos for me. If you write the code in a certain way, then it should be easy to simulate both the transmitter and receiver/robot at the same time and see the servos move. They also let you graph and save serial data. I can see why teachers would like this system.

    Edited to add: don't know about how they show the servo power. Looks likely to cause some problems for kids?
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  • Had to go to Micro Center today, grabbed one to play around with.
  • ercoerco Posts: 18,077
    It's noteworthy that it comes preprogrammed with some demos and launches as soon as you plug it into a USB cable. Very engaging right out of the box.
    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso
  • I just gave one to a neighbor to see if it will work for him as an iBeacon/Eddystone/... Beacon. Another day another promocode?
  • KeithE wrote: »
    Edited to add: don't know about how they show the servo power. Looks likely to cause some problems for kids?

    This looks correct. What's wrong with it? If it's a matter of current draw from the 3.3V regulator, those types of micro servos draw pretty low current. I don't think there's a brownout risk with tapping power off the board.

    So far, micro:bit hasn't heavily involved other BBC properties, but quite easily, the folks in Broadcasting House could combine it with a little Doctor Who, Countdown, Top Gear, or Black Adder action. If you want to involve kids in programming, create a Dalek game with your little microcontroller.


  • I was worried that the same 3V is sent to the connector (therefore servo) and the nRF51822 chip, and that the nRF51822 might not tolerate the noise caused by the servo's current spikes . With the Go kit this supply comes from two AAA batteries. Maybe it's ok because the nRF51822 regulates this down. I didn't take the time to figure out how the micro:bit has configured the power supply. I believe it can use either an internal LDO or DC/DC converter.
  • @Gordon,

    I guess Kids today neither know Dr Who, what a Dalek was or what Black Adder does. Even I don't now what countdown represents, but Top Gear, really?

    maybe I am wrong, but 25+ years ago wont fit with kids today.

    Enjoy!

    Mike
    I am just another Code Monkey.

    A determined coder can write COBOL programs in any language. -- Author unknown.

    The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this post are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.
  • Hmm... My son an his buddies were very much into Dr Who. We would all watch it together. Seeing as I'm an old kid that saw the first ever Dr Who episode in November 1963.

    Well OK that was 8 years ago when he was 12 but Dr Who still a thing.



  • KeithEKeithE Posts: 761
    edited July 15 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Dr Who is still being produced. Check out a few years old episode https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blink_(Doctor_Who) and you'll likely find it much more exciting than the original series.

    Edited to add: hmm - maybe a weeping angel game of some sort?
  • ercoerco Posts: 18,077
    edited July 15 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Those weeping angels are scary!



    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso
  • KeithEKeithE Posts: 761
    edited July 15 Vote Up0Vote Down
    I can't get the River Song spoilers clip to embed #ifailed
  • msrobots wrote: »
    I guess Kids today neither know Dr Who, what a Dalek was or what Black Adder does. Even I don't now what countdown represents, but Top Gear, really?

    You're joking, right?

    Some shows, like Countdown (or its spinoff, 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown) are UK national institutions. Kids watch TV with their parents, and lots of dads still tune into Top Gear. As already mentioned, Doctor Who is still being produced, and thanks to syndication worldwide, is one of the BBCs biggest money-makers.

  • KeithE wrote: »
    I was worried that the same 3V is sent to the connector (therefore servo) and the nRF51822 chip, and that the nRF51822 might not tolerate the noise caused by the servo's current spikes

    From the drawings (and descriptions) these are those puny micro servos that Erco uses on everything. They draw minimal current, and produce negligible spiking.

    It's likely there's some good output filtration on that 3.3V tap. This is a board where you don't want to require forking off to a separate supply for the servos just for a beginner project. Obviously, if you run a bunch of standard servos, those should have their own separate supply, and that can be presented as an intermediate project.

  • ercoerco Posts: 18,077
    KeithE wrote: »
    I can't get the River Song spoilers clip to embed #ifailed

    Maybe this will do: #iwin



    "When you make a thing, a thing that is new, it is so complicated making it that it is bound to be ugly. But those that make it after you, they don’t have to worry about making it. And they can make it pretty, and so everybody can like it when others make it after you."

    - Pablo Picasso
  • Here is a cool example of how to connect the Micro:bit to a MQTT Broker using MQTT-SN and the onboard BLE device to remotely read sensor data from the Micro:bit.
    https://blog.benjamin-cabe.com/2017/01/16/using-mqtt-sn-over-ble-with-the-bbc-microbit#video-tutorial-and-wrap-up

    It would be interesting to do something similar with a Propeller (FLiP?) and either RN-42 or Xbee.
  • Heater. wrote: »
    Huge,
    Acorn followed this up with the Archimedes but that didn't amount to much.
    That made me chuckle. Whilst the Archi did not survive against the onslaught of the IBM PC the ARM processor that was developed for it is now in nearly every phone and tablet in the world!

    And of course the Raspberry Pi and Micro Bit are ARM based. The circle is complete. The Pi has shipped 13 million units. Far more than the BBC micro ever did.

    I would not say it did not amount to much!

    Ok, I'll let you have that one! But, the Archimedes itself, didn't.

    The Micro:bit is easy to use, but they do seem to have taken encapsulation to new levels. This code presents acceleration as a bar-graph.
    basic.forever(() => {
        led.plotBarGraph(
            input.acceleration(Dimension.X),
            1023
        )
    })
    

    I suppose this is an 'easy win' and will tempt the keen into looking into more detail as they get confident.
    South Saxons - "we wunt be druv".
  • TorTor Posts: 1,717
    edited July 17 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Jeff Haas wrote: »
    Saw that too (on BBC though, not The Guardian). But I'm sure I read somewhere that there could only be 12 incarnations of the time lord..

  • That is perhaps why the the 13th Dr is going to be a Time Lady : https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/jul/16/doctor-who-jodie-whittaker-announced-13th-doctor


    :)
  • Heater. wrote: »
    That is perhaps why the the 13th Dr is going to be a Time Lady : https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/jul/16/doctor-who-jodie-whittaker-announced-13th-doctor


    :)

    So, let's have Danny De Vito playing Mary Poppins next. Even Germain Greer must think that's feminism gone too far!!
    South Saxons - "we wunt be druv".
  • Heater.Heater. Posts: 19,255
    edited July 17 Vote Up0Vote Down
    I wonder how this is going to work out.

    If the Dr is female the natural conclusion is that the side kick(s) will be male.

    That removes 50% of my motivation to watch the show right there.

    Or alternatively there is something rainbow going on which is not going to hold my interest either.

    On the other hand if they could pull it off like Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) and John Steed (Patrick Macnee) in the Avengers series then I'm hooked.

    diana-rigg-emma-peel-08.jpg

    http://www.heavymetal.com/news/20-pictures-of-diana-rigg-as-the-deadly-adorable-emma-peel/

  • I think Emma was every boys crush back then. :)
    Infernal Machine
  • Fun fact: Diana Rigg is in Game of Thrones.
    San Mateo, CA
  • Rachael Stirling had already been in a Doctor Who episode, but had she been cast as the new Doctor, that would have provided a neat little closure for millions of Who/Avenger fans (just look her up in Wikipedia if you're not sure who her mother is).
  • Publison wrote: »
    I think Emma was every boys crush back then. :)
    I think I have a copy of every singe episode of the Avengers that Diana Rigg appeared in. OTOH, I know what a dalek is only because I'm a fan of The Great British Bake Off. Dr. Who never registered on my conscious until quite recently. But not a big surprise. AFAIK, it didn't feature a beautiful woman, so how would it have gotten my attention? ;-)

  • Heater. wrote: »
    I wonder how this is going to work out.

    Two guys sailing through time in a Tardis raises eyebrows. Two gals, not so much. The original series contained little or no sexual tension between the Doctor and his companion, and they might return to that, especially as Steven Moffat (and Mark Gatiss) are no longer heading the show. Not that their involvement with the series was detrimental, but it's about time for a change.

    Come to think of it, I'd like to see Moffat return to his comedy roots (I admit I'm a Coupling fan). In both Sherlock and Who he sometimes (frequently?) resorted to storytelling tricks to create cliffhanger drama -- the "then he woke up" stuff gets tiring after a while.
  • GordonMcCombGordonMcComb Posts: 2,998
    edited July 17 Vote Up0Vote Down
    K2 wrote: »
    AFAIK, it didn't feature a beautiful woman, so how would it have gotten my attention? ;-)

    And here we return to the concept of the Companion. From the start, the reboot series featured Billie Piper as the Doctor's companion. I think it's fair that many would consider her good looking, if not 'girl next door' beautiful. (Laurence Fox, of the famous Fox family of British actors, certainly did.) They even went so far as to have the Doctor fall in love with her.

  • TorTor Posts: 1,717
    edited July 18 Vote Up0Vote Down
    When Doctor Who restarted it was shown on Norwegian TV too. But it was insanely annoying that the episodes always ended with a trailer of the next episode, where everything that could have been a surprise would be revealed. Or was it that they showed the trailer at the start? Or both? I don't remember exactly anymore. And IIRC they even showed a trailer for the previous episode.. leaving the actual episode short too. In any case, it bothered me so much that I gradually stopped watching. I think I managed just the four first episodes before I gave up. And that seemed to be common for some of the British series (but not all - I don't think Red Dwarf suffered from that). Super annoying. I wanted the responsibles flogged at the time.

    Well, I don't have a TV anymore.. why bother watching when it all goes downhill anyway.
  • I don't recall DR Who having that annoying issue with trailers and such 10 years ago. I always thought that was an annoying habit of American shows not British. But then I have hardly watched any TV for over 20 years.
  • It's now common in multi-part story arcs in both US and UK programming to show a "previously" and "next" segment. The next segment is largely superfluous, and depending on the skills of the editor, can kill viewership of the followup show. If the unfinished story elements aren't enough to get a viewer to return the next week, a "next" segment probably won't help.

    That said, it's probably a hold-over from a time when TV was largely composed of stand-alone episodes. Each show was a complete story. Only within the last 10-15 years have they gone to these major story arcs, some of which aren't even finished by the end of the season. TV of the 50s through 70s often used a "next week" trailer, but they always introduced a new story.

    I'm not up to the Capaldi Who's, but historically Doctor Who has very limited arcs of just two or three shows. Otherwise the pieces are more or less independent, with some recurring foes (Daleks, Cybermen, whatever).

    What's really worse is to see these on a streaming service that provides a little too much detail in the description of the show. My wife and I are currently enjoying Loch Ness (The Loch in the UK), which is a six-part arc. Acorn TV insists on revealing the resolution of major story points from previous episodes in their writeups for the current episode. So we simply just skip it and go straight to the show. (Conversely, the writeups for the episodes of Grantchester, where there's right now a new season airing on PBS, only barely hint at the story line. They are done much better.)
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