How to make the "propeller clock" by Propeller Chip??

Hello everybody !!
How to make the "propeller clock" by Propeller Chip??
Just like the video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvXjT7MQt_4&feature=fvsr
or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6JnAxTXApw&feature=related



Are any suggession ??

Thanks a lot !!

Comments

  • 18 Comments sorted by Votes Date Added
  • AleAle
    edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Well... you can use the propeller chip to drive the leds... then you need a RTC, LEDs and of course the motor!... they share the name... just that
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Hey, ironically enough, I'm working on one of these myself right now! You need an RTC like the DS1302, which there is an object in the OBEX for, and some surface mount LEDs (I am using 20), and a small Propeller platform. I would suggest the PropModule or the Propstick USB from Parallax, although the Propmodule is preferred and a lot cheaper. His site got hacked so he has a striped down temporary one up now: http://www.propmodule.com/
    You can probably mount the whole setup to a CD and put it on a motor taken out of a CD player, which will already have the attachment on it. You could also use an electric fan. Be warned, however, that although both of these can take the weight of the batteries they MUST be centered. I tried this once on a fan with them on the blade, and they flew off immediately and nearly hit me. I'd suggest the CD, although the fan is already in a presentable package, and you won't have to deal with that circuitry.

    Hope this helps,
    Microcontrolled
    Projects, tutorials, and more! http://microcontrolled.com/
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    You can mount the motor so that its case is the part that is rotating by mounting the shaft as stationary. That would alow you to use the board and motor off of one battery, but how would you turn it off?? Maybee RF, bluetooth.... or maybee even IR by having the IR reciever mounted directly in the center of the spindle.

    After the circuit is built you will definately need some counter weights to balance it as Microcontrolled indicated...
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    To turn it off, you could turn on another motor attached to the axle of the first one that you turn on, spinning in the opposite direction, which would let the module stand still while you turned it off. :-)
    Projects, tutorials, and more! http://microcontrolled.com/
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    To turn it off, you could turn on another motor attached to the axle of the first one that you turn on, spinning in the opposite direction, which would let the module stand still while you turned it off. :-)

    Nice. You have qualified for a cushy job in the Government :smile:
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    for an on/off switch you could put a small coil of wire on the board and place a magnet at the same radius so that the coil moves past it. The coil will produce spikes of voltage which can be rectified and smoothed. Remove the magnet and the spikes will stop.
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Take that idea one more step, as you need a slot-sensor anyway
    Remove the vertical blade (on an arm) that sensor see each turn and if the mcu don't see one for 1 second it will shut down.

    But I never seen one that have power/battery and all items mounted on the prop blade it-self, most use DIY slip ring to transfer power.
  • This thread has inspired me...

    I've just received an ideal board for the creation of a Propeller, propeller display...
    (That is as soon as I finish my "real" work intended for it.)

    Something cool to bring to the UPEW expo.. and the clock is ticking... :)

    OBC
    <br>
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    OBC, did your say your clock could 'tick'? Already. (Tongue in 'beak')
    Harley Shanko
  • edited April 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    I've just finished mine. You can see it and download the source code for it here: http://microcontrolled.com/?p=58
    Unfortunately I couldn't get a hold of an RTC so I have to use the Propellers internal clock for now.... sigh.....
    Projects, tutorials, and more! http://microcontrolled.com/
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Micro,
    Great project! Got a couple of suggestions that might improve the final product. One, use brushes and slip rings to transfer power from an external 5 V supply. Use a large power input cap on the CD to absorb variations and regulate onboard down to 3.3. That eliminates the scary use of batteries on board. Next, how about mounting an led on the base shining through a small hole on the CD into a photo/transistor/diode to act as a sync pulse to determine the position of the display. That way no mater what the speed of the motor, the display can always be in the same position. I haven't looked at the code, but I am sure you still have plenty of prop resources available to syncup the display.
    Jim
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    @RS_Jim: I had thought to add everything on that list except for the brushes and slip rings. What a great idea! This would increase the speed and diminish the wobble almost completely! Where would I buy these?
    Projects, tutorials, and more! http://microcontrolled.com/
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    @Microcontrolled: If you have ever taken apart a DC motor, it is the same concept used to transfer power from the + & - posts to the shaft with the coil windings but a bit simpler. You only need 2 contacts not 3. But I dont see how it would be easy with the motor you chose, You could try 2 circular plates mounted on the underside of the CD, one for + and one for -, but that would add a bit more weight.

    I don't have any discombobulated motors or cd-drives or I would show a pic.

    EDIT: a good example is the same metod used to transfer power to motors on a slot car that has the flat style motors. I'll post a pic here in a few minutes
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Here is a pic of a 1970's ThunderJet motor and chassis.

    1970s-ThunderJet.jpg
    1024 x 846 - 85K
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Micro,


    @RS_Jim: I had thought to add everything on that list except for the brushes and slip rings. What a great idea! This would increase the speed and diminish the wobble almost completely! Where would I buy these?
    Build your own. Go to a craft store and buy some sheet copper. Stiff enough that you can make a strip that will stay against the cd when you attach it to the board and bend up against the cd. Next cut a three inch diameter circle and a 1/4 inch strip out of the copper. Next cut a 2.5 inch circle out of the 3 inch circle. Next cut the 2.5 inch circle to 2.25 inch diameter. cut a hole in the small disk the size of your cd hub. You now have two concentric rings. Soulder wires to each of the rings, drill holes in the cd to pass the wire through, and carefully glue them to the bottom of the cd, running your power wires through to the top side. Make two pieces from the 1/4 in strips into "S" shapes and attach to the board under the CD next to the motor. One comes in contact with the inner ring, the other to the outer ring. Apply power to the two strips, connect the top side wires to a cap and regulator and presto you have a set of slip rings. I would draw you a picture, but I don't have any CAD software on this computer.
    Jim
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Thanks, I'll need to get some sheet copper and then I'll try it out. Thanks for the help!
    Projects, tutorials, and more! http://microcontrolled.com/
  • edited May 2011 Posts: 0Vote Up0Vote Down
    Micro,
    Let me know how it works out! A lot of VCR's use sliprings and brushes to move the video to/from the videoheads to the main electronics. It should work well for just power. The Cap and onboard regulator should cover any power irregularities caused by the slipring/brush system.
    Jim
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