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jeffjohnvol
04-16-2007, 10:33 PM
This question is related to another thread I had posted ( http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?p=644505 (http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?p=644505) ), and thought it warranted a separate thread.

I know the Stamp is great for hobbyists for robotics and the like, but how well does it perform in real world applications on a day in and day out operation? If I needed it for an application where it boot up on its own (when power applied) is it a good vehicle to use? I realize a lot depends on how its programmed as well, bad code makes for bad results. Also, clean protected inputs/outputs that would prevent spikes etc.

Thanks in advance

Jeff

Sorry if this has been posted before.· I searched for "reliability" with no hits.

Loopy Byteloose
04-16-2007, 10:51 PM
This question gets asked quite regularly. I would have to say, 'Yes' and suggest you look at the finished projects. For example, the Nitrous Oxide Fuel injection system or the dumping station of wood chips.

In truth, I think that having the mechanical engineering to support interfacing into the real world is what holds most of us back. A full machine shop [welding, lathe, milling, bending, forge, etc.] is not easy to come by.

Hobbyist are merely people without an industrial resource center and a complete R & D budget. You could use a more sophisticated microcomputer, but I suspect that you might often find yourself ignoring many of the added resources and/or finding them unnecessary.

Regarding toughness, the I/O carries roughly·150% of the millamps before failure·than many competitors do [like the AVRs and such].· Self booting is no real problem.· And if you move over to SX/B and the SX chips, you can have more speed for tasks that really require it.

Plus, people here will try to make your project happen.

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"If you want more fiber, eat the package.· Not enough?· Eat the manual."········


···················· Tropical regards,····· G. Herzog [·黃鶴 ]·in Taiwan


Post Edited (Kramer) : 4/16/2007 3:59:19 PM GMT

PAR
04-16-2007, 11:02 PM
jeffjohnvol said...

...Sorry if this has been posted before.· I searched for "reliability" with no hits.


I got 635 hits for "reliability". Of course, many of the hits use the term in ways not relevant to your specific question; I didn't try to find which hits might be relevant --but, you could.

Use http://search.parallax.com/ for your search engine. Use the "advanced search" page·and use "forums.parallax.com" as the domain to search.

PAR

jeffjohnvol
04-16-2007, 11:09 PM
PAR, Sorry about that.· I may have misspelled it in my search, or perhaps I should have messed with the default setings.· I'll try to be more accurate next time :)

Thanks again.
Jeff

jeffjohnvol
04-17-2007, 12:18 AM
Kramer said...
This question gets asked quite regularly. I would have to say, 'Yes' and suggest you look at the finished projects. For example, the Nitrous Oxide Fuel injection system or the dumping station of wood chips.

In truth, I think that having the mechanical engineering to support interfacing into the real world is what holds most of us back. A full machine shop [welding, lathe, milling, bending, forge, etc.] is not easy to come by.

Hobbyist are merely people without an industrial resource center and a complete R & D budget. You could use a more sophisticated microcomputer, but I suspect that you might often find yourself ignoring many of the added resources and/or finding them unnecessary.

Regarding toughness, the I/O carries roughly·150% of the millamps before failure·than many competitors do [like the AVRs and such].· Self booting is no real problem.· And if you move over to SX/B and the SX chips, you can have more speed for tasks that really require it.

Plus, people here will try to make your project happen.

Kramer, thanks, thats exactly the answer I was looking for, and again, sorry for the repost.

Chris Savage
04-18-2007, 03:15 AM
Jeff,

Before I came to Parallax I had used BASIC Stamps in Security Systems and Custom Audio Amplifiers to replace the large and costly Z80 Boards I used to use. I never had a reported failure on either Security Systems or Custom Amplifiers related to the BASIC Stamp Module. Failures were rare, but almost always mechanical. For example the keypad on an alarm system or the volume control on an amplifier. The BASIC Stamps even survived a friend who was a victim of constant brown-outs, which had at one time damaged the controller it replaced. Every day the Solder Pot Controller gets powered up here to build more BASIC Stamps too! Take care.

http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?p=637023

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support

OzStamp
04-18-2007, 05:43 AM
Hi Jeffjohn

Over the 11 years as· a Parallax distributor here in DownUnder OZ
we have sold many thousands of Basic Stamp modules to mainly industrial
end users ..

The Basic Stamps are very reliable..the back up from Parallax is sensational.

The software is stable and bug free·and Jeff Martin the snr software engineer has done
a wonderfull job on the latest editor ( by special request from one of our industrial customers)

If we can be of any further reference please email· us (PM)

Cheers
Ronald Nollet· Australia

jeffjohnvol
04-18-2007, 10:19 PM
Thanks to all who responded. For the application I am wanting to use this for, some had concerns about electrical failures, and I just wanted to gain some confidence in the Stamp. Not having personal experience with them, I wasn't sure. You guys have definitely relieved my concerns.

My dad sells solutions that involve high-end PLCs. I could see the stamp as a potential low cost solution for some of his customers if he had the programming staff and EE's to design the circuits. The PLC's have the benefit of programming with a simple front end.

Paul Baker
04-18-2007, 11:52 PM
Jeff,

Have you seen this product: http://www.parallax.com/detail.asp?product_id=30064·?


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Paul Baker (mailto:pbaker@parallax.com)
Propeller Applications Engineer
[/url][url=http://www.parallax.com] (http://www.parallax.com)
Parallax, Inc. (http://www.parallax.com)

jeffjohnvol
04-19-2007, 12:44 AM
Paul Baker (Parallax) said...
Jeff,

Have you seen this product: http://www.parallax.com/detail.asp?product_id=30064·?


Yes, I plan on buying one of those.· It will work well in a project I am working on and can be seen in a long winded thread: http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?p=644505

My current project has a 24volt bus with 24 volt switches so that sucker would be perfect.· I don't know that its a true PLC with a lack of a GUI built on to it, but for as a devlopment platform for a BS2px its perfect.· I don't want to start debate on that comment, just going by my limited knowledge of what my dad sells (Allen Bradley et. al. PLCs).· Perhaps its meant as a PLC add on.

OzStamp
04-19-2007, 07:02 PM
Hi JeffJohn.

There are certain applications that will be impossible with the Basic Stamp series.
For example to capture high speed pulses and at the same time have a couple of timers running is very difficult.

PLC's lend themselves very well to do various tasks simultanously (scan times related in mind etc etc) your dad will
and can fill you in on the nitty gritties..

Consider having a closer look at the Propeller also from Parallax.
It hs 8 CPU's in it... it can count pulses at very high frequencies.. it can generate pulses etc etc.
Some very high speed tasks can be achieved with the Propeller .. runs way faster than any PLC I have ever seen.
The Propeller can simultask.. it is spooky when you see it doing 3-4 tasks totally async from each other and all at amazing speeds.

Cheers
Ronald Nollet Australia

jeffjohnvol
04-19-2007, 07:49 PM
Thanks Ronald. Those are good points worth considering. The stamp will work for what I'm doing, but as a low cost PLC replacement (which is what you are talking about) the stamps probably would have too many timing issues.

boeboy
04-19-2007, 09:20 PM
why not make a PLC for the prop?

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lets see what this does... KA BOOM (note to self do not cross red and black)

Tracy Allen
04-19-2007, 11:24 PM
My OWL2pe data loggers are not controlling heavy machinery, but they do see pretty extreme outdoor environments, subzero in the arctic to hot boxes in the desert. They also are exposed to field wiring of far flung sensors and have several layers of i/o protections. The reliability issues usually come down not to the Stamp itself but to the exigencies of field work, to protect the wiring and system from animals, vandalism, and the elements. And of course, as you pointed out, to keep the code itself reliable and to think through what will happen if any given sensor or actuator does not respond in the way it is supposed to.

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Tracy Allen
www.emesystems.com (http://www.emesystems.com)