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View Full Version : Is there a "right" way to remove a basic stamp from the board?



sciguy
02-09-2007, 07:42 AM
Hello, I just ordered a new BS2pe to replace my current BS2, and I'm ready to hook it up to my board of education. Unfortunately, I'm having a tough time getting the BS2 out! I certainly don't want to break it, but it's stuck in there really well. Anybody have any tricks for removing these buggers?

Mike Green
02-09-2007, 07:47 AM
I've used a variety of items, anything from a small screwdriver to a piece of a tongue depressor or popsicle stick. The trick is to get something thin enough to get between the substrate and the socket, broad enough to spread out the force involved, something with a bit of a handle on it so you can rock it from side to side, and soft enough so it won't crack the substrate, yet firm enough to allow one to exert some gentle force. There are chip removers that are commercial variations on what I've described. The important thing is to take your time, work slowly, be gentle, but firm.

sciguy
02-09-2007, 07:58 AM
thanks for the advice, I was able to get it out :)

Chris Savage
02-09-2007, 08:09 AM
To add to what Mike said, or at least emphasize it, as the case may be…Try to pry somewhat evenly. The few customers I know have damaged their modules have pried one end up while the other was fully seated bending the pins at almost 90 degree angles. You could pry a little on one end and then a little on the other to ensure it comes out evenly. One thing I would say is don’t use a metal screwdriver unless you’re sure you’re not gouging the board. You don’t want the tip to cut into any traces. Again, take your time. Take care.

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support

Bill Chennault
02-09-2007, 08:17 AM
Mike--

You are the only that will appreciate this: I learned to R&R chips when I was co-opted one night to swap out about 150 PROMs in some SMC ARCNet cards.

This was not yesterday.

--Bill

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You are what you write.

Mike Green
02-09-2007, 08:41 AM
Good point about holding off on the metal screwdriver because you can scratch/gouge if you're poking with the edge or a corner of the blade.

My ARCNet experience goes way back before SMC's relationship with it. I also learned to pry out EPROMS, kept a whole box of 'em with a UV erasing light as the lid. When you went through all of them, it was time for lunch (or supper) while they were erased to use again.

sciguy
02-09-2007, 10:15 AM
yeah, i ended up using forceps with a rounded edges that i have in my toolkit. They seemed to work pretty well. I will admit, i bent the last pin a little bit, but it was easily repositioned back into place. Plus, I won't really be using that module anymore anyways.

Bill Chennault
02-09-2007, 11:38 AM
Mike--

Compared to you, I am an ARCNet newbie.

However, we built parallel port·networks based on Vector Graphics machines which were HIGHLY cost-effective and off-loaded the mainframe a TREMENDOUS amount, thereby decreasing turnaround time .·. . sometimes from a week to a few seconds.

Before that, we built serial port networks based on Socrates machines. (Do you remember them?) They were not really effective, however they WERE useable. This was in 1978.

--Bill

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You are what you write.

Gadgetman
02-09-2007, 07:15 PM
I use a 'home-made' tool, made out of those blanking-plates from the slots in the rear of PCs.

Take one of those and bend the end to a 90degree angle where it narrows down to fit into a slot in the case.
If you're worried about damaging a chip, or your BS2, just wrap a turn of electrical tape around the tip.

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Don't visit my new website...

Loopy Byteloose
02-09-2007, 09:48 PM
I use a wooden stir stick from Starbucks. Though I don't add sugar to my lattes, I make sure to have a few handy to remove BasicStamps without scratching.

Of course, you can buy an expensive IC tool, but Benj. Franklin was right on.

Above all - go slow - I have had to remove pins from dead, smoldering ICs and solder them to the corner pins of my older BasicStamps due to careless impatience. But that is another story.

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"If you want more fiber, eat the package.· Not enough?· Eat the manual."········


···················· Tropical regards,····· G. Herzog [·黃鶴 ]·in Taiwan

japer
02-11-2007, 07:36 AM
hello
i bent a pin on a stamp to 90 degrees taking it out
i used a solder iron to soften the metal and bent i back
do this slowly
very scary
japer

Forrest
02-11-2007, 08:03 AM
Other users on this forum have mentioned inserting a 24 pin DIP socket in between the stamp and the DIP socket installed on your board. Apparently it's easier to pry the stamp out of the extra socket.

Tim-M
02-11-2007, 08:17 AM
· I like to use a ZIF or·Zero Insertion Force socket in my bread boards and PCB's·for developing or prototyping a project.· If youre not familier with them, ZIF sockets are an I.C. socket that has a lock and·release lever on it.· To insert the I.C., or in this case a Basic Stamp, release the lever and drop the chip into the socket (with zero force - just like the name says) and then lock the lever to make contact with the pins and to hold the chip in place.· I find that this method works great·for programming·Basic Stamps as they tend to move from development to final product or from project to project.

Tim

boeboy
02-12-2007, 02:43 AM
I use one of those precision watch screwdrivers and do the basic stamp one corner at a time.

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lets see what this does... KA BOOM (note to self do not cross red and black)

T&E Engineer
02-12-2007, 03:16 AM
I have to agree with TIM M. Using a Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) socket is the best thing for the BS2 series microcontrollers. I have one for my BOE and one for my PDB. I bought the 40 pin version so it over hangs on my BOE but that's ok. The PDB has a 40 pin socket so it fits nicely. Just press it into place and you are good to go. I bought mine online from Jameco and other places like Mouser and many more have them too.

It also works well to make sure no pins get bent (if you were to lift the chip out with a screwdriver or wooden flat tip device).

I can't say enough·- it works very well for the $7 investment. No problems with my BS2 and BS2px chips from project to project.

aquasapien
02-14-2007, 04:57 AM
I found a tool (no idea what it is called) that looks like small salad tongs. On each end are 2 little hooks that can be hooked under the edges and squeezed. Then pulling strait up the IC is removed perfectly every time.

I payed like 5 bucks for it, but after snapping the legs of 2 different IC's with the screw driver method I thought it was a good idea. It is what they are designed for, and work well for.

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The singularity is close at hand, Genetics, Nanotechnology, Robotics...and I get to be alive to see it.

T&E Engineer
02-14-2007, 05:37 AM
This sounds like a PLCC extraction tool. Used for the square chips not DIP. But, hey if it works - use it.

Chris Savage
02-14-2007, 05:42 AM
Sounds like an IC Puller.

Does it look like this?

http://www-ece.rice.edu/~jdw/figs/ic_puller.jpg

Or this?

http://www.realworldtech.com/includes/images/articles/bios-savior-fig1.jpg

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support

aquasapien
02-14-2007, 05:51 AM
looks exactly like the first one

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The singularity is close at hand, Genetics, Nanotechnology, Robotics...and I get to be alive to see it.

Chris Savage
02-14-2007, 06:12 AM
Okay, that is an IC Puller…This is for DIP chips. The second one is for PLCC. Take care.

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support