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Lightfoot
08-25-2006, 06:33 AM
Where can I find a gold plated RCA jack group like the one in the picture. The picture is the dual jack group, I am also looking for a triple one. I am working on repairing an old stereo that uses these.

Thanks

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Well well, I'm seeing things, three of them.

-Stanley Blystone

Chris Savage
08-25-2006, 06:47 AM
Radio Shack used to (last year) have one just like that...A quick check of their website shows the 4 (274-322) and 8 (274-370) RCA versions...I suspect it's in a few stores and just not on the site.и I can't seem to find aиlot of things on the site that I later find in the store.

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support
csavage@parallax.com (mailto:csavage@parallax.com)

PJ Allen
08-25-2006, 08:56 AM
Remember when Radio Shack sold parts?и And radios?

Lightfoot
08-25-2006, 11:12 AM
Radio shack does not carry them anymore, the ones you see in the stores is old inventory that has not been liquadated. Heck, a few years ago they were trying to get rid of some old school ISA slots you can solder on your motherboard. Remember those things?

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Well well, I'm seeing things, three of them.

-Stanley Blystone

Loopy Byteloose
08-28-2006, 03:06 AM
I remember when Radio Shack wasn't owned by Tandy Corp and had nearly everything that was available.
Tandy Corp sold leather and leather tooling.

I also remember 8 cent postage stamps and Indian Head nickels and paper soda straws and..........

It you really want all gold RCA jacks and plugs, you should try the Yellow Pages for an audio supply speciality shop.
Alternatively, Mouser or Digikey.

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"If you want more fiber, eat the package.и Not enough?и Eat the manual."ииииииии


ииииииииииииииииииии Tropical regards,иииии G. Herzog [и黃鶴 ]иin Taiwan

Paul Sr.
08-28-2006, 10:14 PM
Kramer said...
I remember when Radio Shack wasn't owned by Tandy Corp and had nearly everything that was available.
Tandy Corp sold leather and leather tooling.

I also remember 8 cent postage stamps and Indian Head nickels and paper soda straws and..........



Cut it out - you're making me feel old!!!

Bruce Bates
08-28-2006, 10:47 PM
pwssr -

Old? That's not old. Old is remembering BUYING 3 cent and 4 cent postage stamps, taking Indian Head PENNIES out of circulation! Some of us also remember that Radio Shack operated at on time as Archer - Radio Shack, and that's why you still the Archer brand names on some of the Radio Shack products. The other East Coast electronics supply outfit of that era was Lafayette Radio. I purchased from both of those companies.

Parenthetically, gasoline wars were prevalent back in the 50's and often the price of gasoline dropped as low as 25 CENTS a GALLON! You also got your front windshield and rear window washed, your oil checked, and had the attendant check the air in your tires, if you felt it was necesssary - ALL for the same 25 cents!

Regards,

Bruce Bates

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Loopy Byteloose
08-29-2006, 04:22 AM
Build my first VOM from a Heath kit and really learned about the simplicity of accuracy.

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"If you want more fiber, eat the package.и Not enough?и Eat the manual."ииииииии


ииииииииииииииииииии Tropical regards,иииии G. Herzog [и黃鶴 ]иin Taiwan

Mike Green
08-29-2006, 05:17 AM
Well! I not only had to walk 50 miles each day to elementary school, but catch, kill, dress, and cook a wild turkey to use for my lunches. On alternate days, I ground my own flour and baked bread for the sandwiches.

Once upon a time, there was Canal Street in New York which was a center for surplus electronics. You could wander for several blocks through stores with bins and buckets of parts including vacuum tube counters, Nixie tubes for numeric displays, magnetrons and klystrons and associated "plumbing" for microwaves, core memory frames, later moving on to transistors. There were WW2 surplus radios and test equipment. All kinds of "big" klunky stuff. 2.4GHz used to be past the end of the world in terms of radio exotica. That was heady stuff to fiddle with.

Paul Sr.
08-29-2006, 09:27 PM
Bruce Bates said...
pwssr -

Old? That's not old. Old is remembering BUYING 3 cent and 4 cent postage stamps, taking Indian Head PENNIES out of circulation! Some of us also remember that Radio Shack operated at on time as Archer - Radio Shack, and that's why you still the Archer brand names on some of the Radio Shack products. The other East Coast electronics supply outfit of that era was Lafayette Radio. I purchased from both of those companies.

Parenthetically, gasoline wars were prevalent back in the 50's and often the price of gasoline dropped as low as 25 CENTS a GALLON! You also got your front windshield and rear window washed, your oil checked, and had the attendant check the air in your tires, if you felt it was necesssary - ALL for the same 25 cents!

Regards,

Bruce Bates


and you just made me feel older!

Thanks....

Paul Sr.
08-29-2006, 09:32 PM
Mike Green said...
.... vacuum tube counters, Nixie tubes for numeric displays, magnetrons and klystrons and associated "plumbing" for microwaves, core memory frames, later moving on to transistors. There were WW2 surplus radios and test equipment. All kinds of "big" klunky stuff. 2.4GHz used to be past the end of the world in terms of radio exotica. That was heady stuff to fiddle with.


a partial list of precisely the components I used/worked on in the service!

But the "walk 50 miles each day to elementary school" - you got me there - you win!

Looks like Old is IN around here!!!

kjennejohn
08-30-2006, 11:16 AM
Mike Green said...
Well! I not only had to walk 50 miles each day to elementary school, but catch, kill, dress, and cook a wild turkey to use for my lunches.
And no doubt that was 50 miles uphill BOTH WAYS!
Ah, yes, to be a teenager again and know everything!

Later!
kenjj

Mike Green
08-30-2006, 11:41 AM
I was in a graduation skit once and one of the other skits had the perpetrators telling tall tales in a "Listen to how much tougher it was for me" kind of round-table. One of the earlier versions was approximately what I quoted.

The memories of Canal Street were mine (I didn't buy any of that stuff, but it was interesting to learn about) and I used to get my small parts from Lafayette Radio.

Interestingly, I went to Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland for a couple of years and they had a working Univac I all that time. One of the railroads leased it to keep track of their railroad cars. They had one themselves, but had run out of processing power and didn't want to rewrite their programs. The college itself used a Univac 1107 which was transistorized. The Univac I was up and running generally more hours than then 1107 except for the tape drives which used metal tape. Like most complex high performance mechanical devices, they were forever in need of adjustment.

I think the processor was comparable to a cog, but much slower and larger. It had about 1000 words, about 40 bits (10 decimal digits), and a couple of registers. The processor was in triplicate with voting logic. 2 out of 3 ain't bad! Memory was mercury delay lines.

Post Edited (Mike Green) : 8/30/2006 3:45:57 AM GMT