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View Full Version : Need a plastic part? Just print it.



John Bond
08-03-2006, 08:53 PM
Hi Guys

Ever needed a specialised bracket, lever or part...

Just model it in Alebra (or your favourite modeling package) and·send it off to a service Bureau for printing. (Yes, 3D colour printing). I've just had some holders and brackets·made up in nylon and they're amazing. One day they're images on your PC, the next day they arrive in the post. I use a South African company but here is the web site of one of the many US service providers.

http://www.ems-usa.com/Gallery.html

Not too expensive for small parts and usefull for the robot fanatics among you people.

This is a small gear arm I did. It's·about 100mm long (4 Inches)

Kind regards from Kwa Dukuza - South Africa

John Bond

Charlie Johnson
08-03-2006, 09:13 PM
For anyone in the Seattle area, the Seattle Robotics Society·http://www.seattlerobotics.org

Has an upcoming event:

September 16

A representative from Z-Corp (http://www.zcorp.com/) will demonstrate their 3-dimensional printers

Charlie

metron9
08-03-2006, 11:37 PM
I watched the video on the site and that is just amazing stuff, I did not know they could d that...

Since there is no online quote, could you give an example of price you paid for parts and is it a good idea to do multipul up to fit machine size for better price for more than one part.

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Think outside the BOX!

PLJack
08-04-2006, 05:06 AM
This will save readers a little time.
Link to the best video on Z-corp.
http://www.ems-usa.com/Movies/EMS_ZPrinter_310_Bearing_Tutorial_Large.wmv

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Perfection in design is not achieved when there is nothing left to add.
It is achieved when there is nothing left to take away.

Kevin Wood
08-04-2006, 07:32 AM
This is somewhat related, but definitely not as high tech.

I was wandering around a local craft store (Michael's) one day, and spotted some books on polymer clay, which is essentially a moldable plastic clay. It's basically PVC powder that is mixed with a plasticizer. It can be shaped, molded, etc. like real clay. It can also be baked like clay, which hardens it into a solid plastic structure.

Except for not wanting to bake PVC in the same oven that I would cook with, it looks like a cool method for building robot parts.

Harrison.
08-04-2006, 12:00 PM
The high school that I used to attend (I just graduated) has an excellent Engineering / CAD program.· The instructor purchased a 3D z-printer that is the exact same one shown in the video.· It works extremely well, although you have to put a special superglue into the model so it doesnt breakdown over time.

The printer cost alot, but budgets are weired and allowed the purchase of such an amazing device.· Students make models with Autodesk Inventor and import it to the zprinter software and click print.

steve_b
08-04-2006, 06:55 PM
I picked up something like this last year. Basically, I put some drops of "binder" into a pile of this powder and it will allow me to manipulate the powder drop in to some forms.
They included a small bit of playdoh for casting things.
I had picked it up to fix some plastic pieces on my neices camera that had broken. Worked alright, but man does it stink!!
it can be sanded smooth too!


Kevin Wood said...
This is somewhat related, but definitely not as high tech.

I was wandering around a local craft store (Michael's) one day, and spotted some books on polymer clay, which is essentially a moldable plastic clay. It's basically PVC powder that is mixed with a plasticizer. It can be shaped, molded, etc. like real clay. It can also be baked like clay, which hardens it into a solid plastic structure.

Except for not wanting to bake PVC in the same oven that I would cook with, it looks like a cool method for building robot parts.

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·

Steve

"Inside each and every one of us is our one, true authentic swing. Something we was born with. Something that's ours and ours alone. Something that can't be learned... something that's got to be remembered."

Gadgetman
08-04-2006, 08:13 PM
steve_b said...
I picked up something like this last year. Basically, I put some drops of "binder" into a pile of this powder and it will allow me to manipulate the powder drop in to some forms.
They included a small bit of playdoh for casting things.
I had picked it up to fix some plastic pieces on my neices camera that had broken. Worked alright, but man does it stink!!
it can be sanded smooth too!
Do you have the name of the product?



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Don't visit my new website...

Kevin Wood
08-05-2006, 02:20 AM
Here's a Wikipedia article for those looking for more info.

Most of the info that I've found on the web has been geared towards arts & crafts, jewelry, etc., so if anybody uses this stuff for robotics, you'll probably be a pioneer in the field!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymer_clay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymer_clay)

steve_b
08-05-2006, 03:49 AM
Gadgetman said...

steve_b said...
I picked up something like this last year. Basically, I put some drops of "binder" into a pile of this powder and it will allow me to manipulate the powder drop in to some forms.
They included a small bit of playdoh for casting things.
I had picked it up to fix some plastic pieces on my neices camera that had broken. Worked alright, but man does it stink!!
it can be sanded smooth too!
Do you have the name of the product?



Yup, it's called PLASTEX
http://plastex.home.att.net/
Can't remember what I paid for it, but I had customs charges too!

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·

Steve

"Inside each and every one of us is our one, true authentic swing. Something we was born with. Something that's ours and ours alone. Something that can't be learned... something that's got to be remembered."