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cdub
07-13-2006, 12:34 AM
Is there any recommendations either by brand or feature set for a multimeter (not Fluke like).
Don't want to break the bank, but didn't want to·buy one and later find I can't measure something for a stamp project.

Thanks,
Cdub
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SSteve
07-13-2006, 12:54 AM
I recently bought an Extech EX330 and I like it a lot. It measures capacitance, resistance, frequency, duty cycle, and temperature (in addition to your standard Volts and Amps). Jameco has them for under $50.

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Paul Sr.
07-13-2006, 01:31 AM
cdub said...
Is there any recommendations either by brand or feature set for a multimeter (not Fluke like).
Don't want to break the bank, but didn't want to buy one and later find I can't measure something for a stamp project.



Thanks,

Cdub


I agree with SSteve - Extech are really nice meters for the price. Check on Ebay - I got a NIB EXTECH MM560 for $61.00 - it had never been opened! That's an outrageous deal, but you should be able to find other models a good prices.

Chris Savage
07-13-2006, 01:58 AM
This thread is being moved from the·BASIC Stamp·Forum to the·Sandbox Forum.

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Chris Savage
Parallax Tech Support
csavage@parallax.com (mailto:csavage@parallax.com)

cdub
07-13-2006, 02:04 AM
ssteve,
Thanks for the recommendation; I'm just about decided on that one.
Pwssr, what is the advantage to the model you have? It seems to be more accurate, but doesn't have temp reading as a trade-off.

John R.
07-13-2006, 02:46 AM
In terms of "accuracy", I weigh that feature too highly, for a number of practical reasons.

First and foremost, chances are that your setup and application of the meter and probes will induce more error/inconsistency that the meter itself.

Think about what you’re really after. Do you really care if the reading is 4.989 volts or 5.019? Normally, what most of care about is more along the lines of “is the pin high or low”, or “does the value go up or down, and by a little or a lot”. We may think more in terms of numbers, but I would guess my verbiage is really what we’re looking for.

Last of my points would be calibration. Do you have access to a regular and certified calibration service and/or certified and calibrated standards? If not, the extra “accuracy” of a meter will not have meaning. It may read out to 4 or 5 decimal places, but if it’s not calibrated, it won’t mean a thing.

On the other hand, if you’re really trying to develop a 32 bit A to D converter, throw out everything I said, and get the most accurate meter you can, and make sure you keep all your calibrations current http://forums.parallax.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

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John R.

8 + 8 = 10

Paul Sr.
07-13-2006, 02:55 AM
cdub said...

Pwssr, what is the advantage to the model you have? It seems to be more accurate, but doesn't have temp reading as a trade-off.


I didn't need the temp, and I did like the accuracy AND it has a PC interface (which I was kind of interested in). The truth is, I might have purchased a "lesser" model if I didn't stumble on this one for such short $$$!