PDA

View Full Version : Suggestions for the NULT Telescope



Humanoido
03-01-2012, 10:47 AM
http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/03/black-hole-found.html

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eev7HfUaOkQ/T09XJSyYTbI/AAAAAAAAAN8/xsXhxhGqNgQ/s400/bh1.jpg
A Black Hole in the center of the galaxy as seen with the
Big Brain's new 945-inch NULT Telescope. The New Ultra
Large Telescope went into full operation this week.
Courtesy Big Brain & NASA.
___________________________


For a limited time only, you can make suggestions here
on pointing the Big Brain's New Ultra Large 945-inch Telescope (NULT).
We'll collect together the best suggestions and the Big Brain will see
what's out there in space. Results will be posted here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/).

Currently we have the discovery images of the most remote two galaxies
in the Universe and a black hole at the center of the galaxy. Only two
images are taken so far and we don't know what we'll find on planets,
comets, asteroids, the Moon and moons, or other selected objects in the
solar system and Universe. For example, if the moon Europa has a water
ice ocean, can we use polarization techniques to see below the surface?
Maybe discover larger life forms if they exist?

The Big Brain has put the huge NULT telescope into use for a limited
time using resources provided by the Big Brain and NASA.

Spiral_72
03-01-2012, 03:14 PM
I'd like to see whats inside the red box in M31. M31 has fairly large, large apparent size, so I'd estimate the box to be about the size of the Orion Nebula. I can't see it from my location.

Edit: I'd also like to see what the huge hunk of crap is on Mars. I'm trying to find the link...... it's been said it's a doctored photo, not real, some say it's a real Martian base from a billion years ago. I think it's interesting, that's it.

Bean
03-01-2012, 03:17 PM
I'd like to see the rover that was left on the moon.

Bean

ElectricAye
03-01-2012, 04:31 PM
I wanna see where this guy went to.

http://www.kickseat.com/storage/364_30_2001-A-space-odyssey-1968.png?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1328533609989

"I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that."

Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)
03-01-2012, 04:42 PM
... not to mention these two characters:

http://i1.squidoocdn.com/resize/squidoo_images/-1/lens13648661_1286418262Lose_Myself_With_You_by_s

-Phil

erco
03-01-2012, 04:53 PM
... and their baby...

90175

Dave Hein
03-01-2012, 05:04 PM
Humanoido, could you point NULT at Kepler-22b? It's an earth-like planet that 600 light-years away. It's orbit is in the middle of the habitable zone around its sun, and you might be able to detect some evidence of life there.

Humanoido
03-02-2012, 09:03 AM
ElectricAye As I recall, they went to Jupiter where they found a black Monolith orbiting in space. I'll point the telescope at Jupiter and see what is shows. I'm warning you though, the Universe Penetrator was designed for LY penetration to the EOU Edge of Universe. I don't know what it will do on a planet so bright and so close in the solar system, though I'm very interested to find out.

Spiral_72 I'm looking at the first results showing what's inside the tiny arm section of M31 galaxy, returned from the NULT Telescope, and the full color image is stunning, going beyond my greatest expectations and outstripping my wildest imagination! You will not be disappointed.

Bean I was skeptical at first, that the 24-meter telescope could show much of anything on the Moon as small as the Lunar Rover. I poured over the resolution 1.22 Lambda over D several times and calculated the tangent of the radians and found the computational math results were subjective based on the actual wavelength which varied over the optical spectrum. However, it looks like you'll get your wish.

Dave Hein as you know, NASA's initial involvement with the detection of Kepler-22b was made by studying the light intensity of eclipsing parenting star. So I was a bit skeptical that NULT could see anything at all, other than a very tiny dim star-like dot. Preliminaries look very promising for an optical observation result so I think we'll see something. It will be up to you apply your yardstick criterion to determine if there's life on the planet. I don't know how you'll do that.

Phil and erco you're going to be very disappointed being left out of the program. As far as your request, I don't know what your talking about.

LAST CHANCE! Get your requests in now! What would you like to see through this giant telescope? I have enough time and energy for the requests of two more people.

Ttailspin
03-02-2012, 03:35 PM
What are you going to be looking for/at Humanoido? or.. whats on your list of star spotting?
As for myself, Losing pluto as a planet was a shame...but, I am not sure how pointing a telescope at it will help though...

Light Years don't have much meaning to me, I understand it's a measurement, but so is the centimeter and millimeter...
I have mastered the feet, inch, and mile, but Light Year? just how far can light travel in a non leap year?
Can you put light year into perspective? or is that like asking to describe the universe and give two examples?


-Tommy

Humanoido
03-02-2012, 04:52 PM
Spiral_72, your results have arrived.

90204

More information here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/03/nult-andromeda.html).

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 12:56 AM
Bean, your results have arrived.

90215

More information here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/03/nult-telescope-lunar-rover.html).

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 01:57 AM
What are you going to be looking for/at Humanoido? or.. whats on your list of star spotting? As for myself, Losing pluto as a planet was a shame...but, I am not sure how pointing a telescope at it will help though...-Tommy

The New Ultra Large Telescope NULT is a Parallax Propeller Big Brain project to explore the Universe. In particular, there's great interest in penetrating space time and reaching the EOU End of Universe status to attempt the detection of alternate Bubble Universes, map the edge barrier, and gain data about what mysteries hide on the other side.

The NULT Telescope Suggestion Pointing Program was initiated to test the telescope on selected objects, and work the kinks out of the system. Plus everyone is interested in how this massive new invention will perform. This has led to the Brain's founding of the new Deep Space Center, a place designed to handle the 24-meter telescope operations and harbor the influx of NASA data.

In its short time of telescope operations, it has accumulated enhanced observational data for the following:


Black Hole at the center of the galaxy

Two of the farthest remote galaxies known to mankind

Imaged the NEOU Near End of Universe, only .7 LY from the edge

Observed Kepler 22b, an earth-like planet believed to support life

Located the Lunar Rover on the Moon from the 1970s Apollo program

Penetrated deep into the Andromeda Galaxy

It's amazing what you can do with a few Propeller chips..

The loss of Pluto as a planet was shocking. However, every week there's some great new discovery so change in the field of Astronomy has become rapid and commonplace. Pluto is good for many things. In the future, it can be mined for its valuable metals in performing advanced metalurgy. For now, it serves the study of Astrophysics and could be a test point for NULT remote imaging. In the future, it's remote location may become a stepping stone base for star travel, i.e. jumping out from the solar system deeper into the galaxy and beyond.

Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)
03-03-2012, 02:02 AM
It's amazing what you can do with a few Propeller chips..
How, exactly, did the Propeller contribute to the images that you've posted?

-Phil

Martin_H
03-03-2012, 02:22 AM
Humanoido, at astronomical scales objects like stars have a diameter smaller than the wavelength of visible light. This means that it is not possible to resolve them to a disk even with a 900 inch telescope. There are exceptions to this rule using interferometry, but that requires multiple Keck sized telescopes spaced fairly far apart with extremely precise techniques to achieve synthesized aperture.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 02:48 AM
Martin, for at least 30 years astronomers have had techniques for resolving the the disc of stars as well as detail on the stars. Sub arc diameters are not a limitation and multiple telescopes placed apart are not a requirement. There are many such published images in journals like Sky and Telescope. Therefore it it possible to resolve stars, not only with a 24-meter telescope, but those telescopes much smaller.

Martin_H
03-03-2012, 03:14 AM
Humanoido, I am aware of how astronomers resolve the disks of stars. Except for a handful of red supergiant stars (e. g. Betelgeuse) it requires interferometry as I said above. Prior to the Keck they did it using radio telescopes which have a longer wavelength and makes it easier. But there is no way to synthesize enough aperture without it.

Even adaptive optics won't work because they only undo the effects of bad seeing and let you reach the diffraction limit.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 03:25 AM
“It's amazing what you can do with a few Propeller chips..”


Phil
Big Brain started out with only a few Propeller chips. Evolution of a predominantly Propeller chip based Big Brain has led to Big Brain’s DSC Deep Space Center which is fronting management of the NULT including acquisition of data.

Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)
03-03-2012, 03:28 AM
So, then, there were no Propeller programs directly involved in any of the image processing? I guess I'm confused about how the Propeller gets credit for this.

-Phil

T Chap
03-03-2012, 03:32 AM
Phil, I don't think you are supposed to ask real questions regarding the Big Brain or any of it's derivatives.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 04:04 AM
Martin
Adaptive Optics in this sense won't apply to the NULT or telescopes in space.
During my tenure as Observatory Director I recall small stars other than just Red Giants being resolved.
This was accomplished before the Keck.
If you are interested in this technique, contact me by email here
(http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/p/contact.html)and I will provide more information when time permits.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 04:07 AM
T Chap, as they say, "You may ask."

Spiral_72
03-03-2012, 04:31 AM
Spiral_72, your results have arrived.

90204

More information here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/03/nult-andromeda.html).

Well look at that. Man I could keep you busy for weeks. It's amazing that there are a thousand solar systems in that fuzzy blob M31.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 04:32 AM
I guess I'm confused..

Without the Propeller, there would be no Big Brain.
Without a Big Brain, there would be no NULT.
This all began with a few Propeller chips.
This was my only statement.
No other information is available.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 04:39 AM
Well look at that. Man I could keep you busy for weeks. It's amazing that there are a thousand solar systems in that fuzzy blob M31.When I saw the results, I was just blown away never expecting to see that much. I agree, one could spend weeks, leading up to a lifetime studying this. In the tiny selected area, it's transformed into a giant menagerie of rich colors with stars, galaxies and nebula! The awe inspired by M31 is matching the greatness of M42.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 06:56 AM
Dave Hein, your results have arrived.

90236

More information here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/03/nult-kepler-22b.html).

W9GFO
03-03-2012, 07:31 AM
Without disclosing the method of obtaining these images I think that this is doing the opposite of educating. The information is presented as scientific but I do not believe it is. Please prove me wrong.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 08:10 AM
Honda does not disclose the methods of humanoid ASIMO, yet you can see the results of its performance and enjoy it. Scientific data can be presented in many different ways. When you watch a Discovery channel show about the Universe, the technical details and formulae are not provided, yet you can enjoy the information and see the visuals based on the formulae without understanding the details. Without understanding, truth can exist.

W9GFO
03-03-2012, 08:44 AM
When I watch a documentary about the universe I can look up the Hubble, the VLA or Arecibo and gain information as to how the data was gathered. Where can I go to learn about the 24 meter NULT?

We have seen images and video of Asimo in action, not footprints of where it has walked or pictures that it has drawn.

Scientific data is not scientific if it cannot be subjected to peer review.

Martin_H
03-03-2012, 11:19 AM
Martin
Adaptive Optics in this sense won't apply to the NULT or telescopes in space.
During my tenure as Observatory Director I recall small stars other than just Red Giants being resolved.
This was accomplished before the Keck.
If you are interested in this technique, contact me by email here
(http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/p/contact.html)and I will provide more information when time permits.

I am sorry Humanoido, but I can't take this offline. You are making claims in a public forum that I believe are flat out wrong. Others reading this who know less about astronomy will learn something incorrect.

Yes there are techniques for measuring stellar diameters via occultation, but that does not produce an image. You can also measure stellar brightness over time and measure rotation rate, but again that won't produce an image. You can use the estimated stellar diameter and rotation rate to produce a map of stellar surface features, but again this is not an image.

As I said before, a telescope in space can reach the diffraction limit because there's no atmosphere. However resolving objects turns out to require telescopes of an extremely large size. This Web page from Cornell University gives a good overview:

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=134

The bottom line is that the lunar rover has a diameter of 3.1 meters which from Earth orbit would require a telescope 75 meters in diameter (or equivalent synthetic aperture) to resolve. No such technology exists.

Humanoido
03-03-2012, 12:45 PM
For a limited time only, you can make suggestions here on pointing the Big Brain's New Ultra Large 945-inch Telescope (NULT). We'll collect together the best suggestions and the Big Brain will see what's out there in space.

The limited time has expired for making suggestions to point the NULT.
Thanks to everyone who made excellent suggestions and helped with
ideas for testing and refining the NULT Telescope.
All further information and details will appear here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/) and here (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/p/disclaimer.html).