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Bits
02-29-2012, 05:07 PM
The short definitions

Space:
a. Space is the boundless, three-dimensional extent in which objects and events occur and have relative position and direction. Physical space is often conceived in three linear dimensions.

Time:
b. Time is a part of the measuring system used to sequence events, to compare the durations of events and the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change such as the motions of objects.


Gravity:
c. Gravitation, or gravity, is a natural phenomenon by which physical bodies attract with a force proportional to their mass. Gravitation is most familiar as the agent that gives weight to objects with mass and causes them to fall to the ground when dropped.


Objects:
d. In physics, a physical body or physical object (sometimes simply called a body or object) is a collection of masses, taken to be one. For example, a cricket ball can be considered an object but the ball also consists of many particles (pieces of matter).


Links
a. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space
b. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time
c. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitation
d. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_body

Here is what I think so far.


If it is noted that Gravity is the cohesion of space and time: space being a dynamic dimensional function, with objects. Time being the other dynamic dimensional function of, rate of change of an object. When they are combined into a single manifold you obtain spacetime.


Spacetime has to be the inverse function of gravity. People are looking for gravity waves and probably won’t find them until they start looking for spacetime waves (our world directly). Take the inverse and you should have gravity waves.

I see gravity as the inverse of our world. Before you laugh envision this; we are mass in space traveling at a rate of speed. Doing so creates spacetime. This space time creates a wave, perhaps a signature, or fingerprint in the universe if it helps you to see. The effects of this creation in spacetime result in gravity as a byproduct. If our spacetime fingerprint was massive enough we would attract other spacetime entities.

It sort of reminds me of Ohms law

V = IR

Where V=gravity, I=time and R=space.

Ttailspin
02-29-2012, 05:22 PM
Are you asking, Why can the crickit ball leave the hand and enter space?
Or are you asking about the Quantum Chaos spinning darkness of space in general?

Bits
02-29-2012, 05:23 PM
I am simply stating ill someday win a noble prize :smile:

Ttailspin
02-29-2012, 05:26 PM
I will read your paper..:) will your title be "Bits riding the big wave" ? :)...

idbruce
02-29-2012, 06:13 PM
Bits

You intrigue me.

Bruce :)

GordonMcComb
02-29-2012, 07:42 PM
I tripped up on the first definition. I always thought it was

Space
a. The final frontier.

That and some split infinitives.

-- Gordon

bill190
03-01-2012, 12:46 AM
You wouldn't happen to own one of these would you?

90157

jdolecki
03-01-2012, 12:57 AM
Have you met the Big Brain and Humanoido‎?

lanternfish
03-01-2012, 02:16 AM
Hi Bits

It is generally accepted that a Gravity Wave is related to Fluid Dynamics e.g. a wave in a pond. You appear to be referring to Gravitational Waves (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_wave)?

Humanoido
03-01-2012, 04:26 AM
If our spacetime fingerprint was massive enough we would attract other spacetime entities.
It sort of reminds me of Ohms law V = IR Where V=gravity, I=time and R=space.Excellent thread, topics, and formula. If the footprint of space-time becomes large enough, it transcends into a singularity. Gravity waves are all around us. The larger bodies affect space-time in greater ways. Black holes are serious contenders. I plan to create a special telescope that can detect the gathering of gravity waves. Obviously Newtonian mirrors won't work for this. As there are now numerous known black holes it would be a cinch to dial in their positions for calibrations and study. I would be interested in the detection of very small black holes as they may be all around us at closer distances affecting our space-time. The person that can gather and collect these tiny black holes will be the master of energy usage. There's enough energy in these small black holes to power the Earth far beyond our lifetimes.

Regarding the Big Brain, it's possible we'll see future exploration of space-time with spinoff technologies from the advent of the following new developments:

The Universe Penetrator UP
http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/02/penetrator_27.html

The New Ultra Large Telescope NULT
http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/02/new-ultra-large-telescope-nult.html

Of course the Universe Penetrator also detects and penetrates through space time. In the First Light image using both the UP and the HULT, we see two of the most remote galaxies currently known to exist, at a distance of 13 billion light years, which is only .7 light year from the known edge of the Universe.

First LIght
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-01Z0ganOzaI/T0wvwQt3U4I/AAAAAAAAANs/jp50dNGDBvE/s1600/most+distant.jpg

In this UP+NULT created full color image, there are thousands of objects visible in space time curvature between the farthest remote galaxies and the Earth. The Big Brain is interested in investigating more space time curvatures to find minimal populated regio for study focus on the 13.7 LY EOL End of Universe Barrier.

Reflection
We never know where these studies will lead us. For example, there's a man that did a Quantum Mechanics experiment recently and he was surprised to discover the existence of an alternate reality, existing and co-phasing with the one in which we live.

The Big Brain is currently made from enhanced Parallax Propeller chips and AMD streaming processors. Recent partnering with NASA has opened up access to equipment valued at billions of dollars.

Big Brain & NASA Team Together (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/02/big-brain-nasa-team.html)
NASA Resources for Propeller Brain (http://humanoidolabs.blogspot.com/2012/02/nasa-resources-available.html)

Clock Loop
03-01-2012, 05:25 AM
Sorry girl, I beat you to the punch.
Heres the info you need to accomplish what you want.

Question. Resolve: E = MC²

Energy = Mass * (Speed of light squared)
Energy = Infinite Mass (search wikipedia for REFERENCE)
Energy = Pattern * Energy (what else would mass be when it travels light speed)
Energy/Energy = Pattern * Energy/Energy

Answer: Pattern

Photons were mysterious until people used critical thought and experimentation.
Then they used a specific PATTERN to turn electrons into photons of many colors. (aka CRT, then LCD)

The Gravitroid is no different.
(gravi-troid: center of all known gravitational influences)
http://www.gravitroid.com (product/disclosure information coming soon)

Float.


P.S. your inversion analogy is pretty good, consider all matter as, inverted structures that "invert" at their resonant energy signature, causing gravitational waves in the process.

To manipulate gravity, you need to fluctuate mass in rapid succession.
(expansion and collapse of mass <--> energy <--> mass, and repeat.)

This cannot be accomplished without matter fabrication technologies (a.k.a. replicators)
but you can always contact DARPA for that technology.

lardom
03-03-2012, 06:26 AM
This is an area I like to think about from time to time. I believe Isaac Newton thought that if the sun were to vaporize the earth would immediately fly out of its orbit. Albert E. surmised that couldn't be true. Since it would take eight and a half minutes before we knew what happened the earth fly out of its orbit for no apparent reason. He concluded that not even gravity could travel faster than light.

Time slows as we approach the speed of light. I can't prove this but at least on an 'X,Y' graph you could show that as the vector approaches the speed of light, time approaches zero. At the speed of light time = zero. Light could be everywhere at the same time.

I see the space-time continuum as an analogy to fabric. Celestial bodies travel along a curve created by the presence of other bodies. This is how I think of gravity. Of course these are just a few of the questions I have. I like the discussion.

Beau Schwabe
03-03-2012, 07:02 PM
Interesting topic!

Using your analogy of Ohms law...

Gravity is a result of space-time having to deal with matter ... similar to heat generated in a wire when you pass power through it. The force of gravity is very small compared to other forces we know and understand, but what gravity does have going for it is purely the vast quantity of matter that interacts with space-time.

space-time can be related to Power in the since that you can't have Power without Voltage and Current ... similarly, you can't have space-time without space or without time.

An analogy of space-time would be the contents inside of a moving vehicle. The motion of the vehicle being space-time. To generate gravity waves, you would need to "artificially" disrupt the flow of space-time by increasing the speed of space-time or slowing it down. ...or artificially create and/or destroy matter. This is a daunting task... it's not like we can hang out hand out the window and feel the motion effects of the vehicle.

As far as tapping off of the space-time energy (Power), assuming we could affect the flow of space-time by some fractional amount, an analogy might be...
Ok, so I have 1 million Amps going through this 1 nano-Ohm resistor ... what can you do with that 1 Milli-Volt of electricity across the resistor?

Humanoido
03-04-2012, 01:56 AM
Lots of good analogies and thinking in this thread.
What is interesting and fascinating about gravity waves
is their ability to change time. As we know, the Earth
is a serious contender of gravity. Breaking the bonds
of Earth's gravity during a rocket launch requires
millions of tons of force. But what happens when we
examine a clock undergoing the effects Earth's gravity?

Not surprising, two clocks, one at the lowest point
and one at the highest point, with the greatest
gravity differential, will read different times.
That's because the clock experiencing more
gravity is experiencing time travel. So you only
need to generate an intense gravitational field to
experience a change in time.

Gravity waves could be generated artificially or
collected from space time. The best contender of
manipulating gravity is a black hole because they
come in different package sizes and theoretically
could be man made. Stand in front of one, and like
the different and separated clocks at the two points
on Earth, the gravity waves will change your
time, accelerating you into the future.

This is a way to time travel, without using
a space ship traveling at high speeds. So if we're
sort of lazy and don't want to build a "light speed"
star ship, we could position ourselves in front of a
huge gravity wave generator, like a black hole.

But how would you use the ability to travel into the
future? Time is fluid and like water flows in one
direction. As we know it, we can't go back in time,
though we can see back in time under special
conditions.

Using black holes again, we can see
ourselves existing moments in the past. How will
a super civilization use the technology of harnessing
gravity waves and bending, shaping the nuances
of space and time? Will they choose to live longer
and accelerate into the future? Will they observe the
past in different places of space time, i.e. at the front
of a modulating worm hole, through time portals?
How will the technology of harnessing gravity waves
shape our future lives?

prof_braino
03-05-2012, 02:29 PM
It sort of reminds me of Ohms law

V = IR

Where V=gravity, I=time and R=space.

Looks like you are gettingcloser to the source code you seek.

So what experiment do we do to to test that one has an affect on another?
Seems the only thing we can control is gravity, by varying the mass?
What kind of detector is appropriate?
Maybe this needs to be tested in space, so its less affected by more massive local bodies?

Mark_T
03-05-2012, 05:44 PM
This is an area I like to think about from time to time. I believe Isaac Newton thought that if the sun were to vaporize the earth would immediately fly out of its orbit. Albert E. surmised that couldn't be true. Since it would take eight and a half minutes before we knew what happened the earth fly out of its orbit for no apparent reason. He concluded that not even gravity could travel faster than light.

Of course vapour still has mass, so "magically disappear" rather than "vaporize" might make more sense. Of course the sun is vapour (well, plasma, which is kind of more vaporized than vapour!). Unfortunately if the sun "magically disappeared" then magic would exist and all bets are off about the result ;)

As for space, time, gravity I'd better wait till I've finished "The Road to Reality" by Roger Penrose before I can comment with authority (and that will take a long time, its 1100 pages)

Bits
03-05-2012, 11:19 PM
Good responses from some of you guys.

Thinking out loud here. How do we detect an inverse gravity wave (gravitational waves to satisfy the particulars :smile:)?

I think we wont need a massive object like a black hole to identify this. I think that if we look in the right places this question can be answered. I am on to something ill post more as soon as my brain can write what my minds eye sees.

DavidSmith
03-06-2012, 02:41 AM
I are engin - enjinee -

I am a socially inept techer, so this may be a bit pedestrian.

I always wondered why they go to all the trouble of trying to detect gravity waves w big devices that work on a universal scale.

I would think you could get the same result (and confirm/deny) w a desktop experiment. Sensitive detector, and bit mass that goes by on carousel. Wouldn't the measured (sin?) wave of greater/lesser attraction be the same thing as a gravity wave?

Humanoido
03-06-2012, 03:24 AM
How do we detect an inverse gravity wave (gravitational waves to satisfy the particulars :smile:)?Antimatter is the opposite inverse of all matter. It's the one case in which gravity waves and inverse gravity waves are guaranteed to annihilate each other.

Duane Degn
03-06-2012, 03:40 AM
Antimatter is the opposite inverse of all matter. It's the one case in which gravity waves and inverse gravity waves are guaranteed to annihilate each other.

I don't think this is the case. It takes just as much energy to create antimatter as it does matter. The high energy density of matter is what distorts space/time. Antimatter is just as energy dense as matter. Antimatter is not negative energy so it would distort space/time in the same direction as matter.

Martin_H
03-06-2012, 03:58 AM
I always wondered why they go to all the trouble of trying to detect gravity waves w big devices that work on a universal scale.

I would think you could get the same result (and confirm/deny) w a desktop experiment. Sensitive detector, and bit mass that goes by on carousel. Wouldn't the measured (sin?) wave of greater/lesser attraction be the same thing as a gravity wave?

Gravity is insanely weak but long range force. All the objects near your experiment that are moving around will generate noise that would likely overwhelm your signal. So you need a really clear signal like merging neutron stars that will radiate higher energy waves.

Duane Degn
03-06-2012, 04:07 AM
Gravity is insanely weak but long range force. All the objects near your experiment that are moving around will generate noise that would likely overwhelm your signal. So you need a really clear signal like merging neutron stars that will radiate higher energy waves.

To go a long with what Marin said, detecting gravitational waves is not at all the same thing as detecting gravity from an object. It is possible to measure the gravitational pull between objects (not just between an object and the earth).

Humanoido
03-06-2012, 05:14 AM
Antimatter is not negative energy so it would distort space/time in the same direction as matter.

Not true in the case of annihilation. A containment Universe of matter relative to a containment Universe of antimatter and everything contained within relative to each will create annihilation when occupying the same place in space and time.

Even today there is no agreement as to the interactions of antimatter with gravity and no concluding statement can be made about its distortion of space and time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_interaction_of_antimatter
When antimatter was first discovered in 1932, physicists wondered about how it would react to gravity. Initial analysis focused on whether antimatter should react the same as matter or react oppositely. Several theoretical arguments arose which convinced physicists that antimatter would react exactly the same as normal matter. They inferred that a gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter was implausible as it would violate CPT invariance, conservation of energy, result in vacuum instability, and result in CP violation. It was also theorized that it would be inconsistent with the results of the Eötvös test of the weak equivalence principle. Many of these early theoretical objections were later overturned.

Bits
03-06-2012, 02:25 PM
If I can envision the universe as the synthesis of space and time, then it becomes more clear to me that gravity may be a counterfeit force? Either gravity is a warped imprint (an illusion) caused by spacetime or it has to be the inverse of spacetime. I am starting to wonder. If it weren't for spacetime gravity would not exist so is gravity real in the way that we think it is?

Martin_H
03-06-2012, 02:50 PM
To go a long with what Marin said, detecting gravitational waves is not at all the same thing as detecting gravity from an object. It is possible to measure the gravitational pull between objects (not just between an object and the earth).

Indeed. I've seen desktop experiments which use extremely sensitive scales to measure the weight of an object. By positioning another object near the first you can pull it upward ever so slightly and decrease that weight which the scale can detect. That is not a gravity wave.

Gravity waves are a change to space time itself. To measure them you need a pair of interferometers at right angles to each other which have a known good measurement. As the gravity wave propagates past the interferometer it will changed the distance one measures relative to the other and it will deviate from the known good value. While this sounds simple it requires elimination of all kinds of errors in the known good values which is not easy to do.

Once you measure one the question will then shift to was the measurement real or an error? Given the neutrino FTL experiment going back and forth for months until it was concluded it was an experimental error I imagine there will be some false starts before one is really measured.

Bits
03-06-2012, 03:04 PM
Here is kind of what I am thinking.

Normal idea of spacetime. A object provides a dent in the fabric of the universe and thus gravity is seemingly born.
90316






















My idea of space time. Although I cant cut and paste well you'll get the idea.

See the idea is simple it assumes no gravity and that space time warps in all directions. This notion shows that the universe oscillate at all levels of reality. A black hole, all the atoms in a human, light, energy etc. everything is in oscillation with respect to something else, even time.

In my crude picture an object pulls spacetime one direction while another object is wanting to pull it another direction, this byproduct is an oscillation. It may appear to be gravity or is it?

90317

skylight
03-06-2012, 03:15 PM
Isn't it string theory that mentions everything oscillating?

Duane Degn
03-06-2012, 03:23 PM
If I can envision the universe as the synthesis of space and time, then it becomes more clear to me that gravity may be a counterfeit force?

I've had similar thoughts about gravity. The fact that gravitational acceleration behaves exactly the same as acceleration from increasing ones speed is a very profound concept and hadn't been explained until Einstein came along.

I minored in physics, but the only work I ever had to do with gravity and space time was a few qualitative exercises (what would a laser beam passing through an accelerating elevator look like(the light bends the same as if the acceleration were from gravity)). The math required to perform general relativity (which deals a lot with gravity and space time) calculations was and is beyond what I have learned (which majoring in chemistry was a lot IMO). But they (physicists) do have mathematical models that work very well at predicting and explaining the interaction between mass/energy and space time.

One thing I did learn with what little physics I've had is many things in the universe don't exist in the a way many think they do. The whole "electron wave" thing still boggles my mind. And gravity as warped space time is also one of those mind boggling concepts.

prof_braino
03-06-2012, 06:38 PM
I always wondered why they go to all the trouble of trying to detect gravity waves w big devices that work on a universal scale.

I would think you could get the same result (and confirm/deny) w a desktop experiment. Sensitive detector, and bit mass that goes by on carousel. Wouldn't the measured (sin?) wave of greater/lesser attraction be the same thing as a gravity wave?

The effect of the huge mass of the earth drowns out the tiny mass of the desktop expertiment, so it get really hard to detect anything. Kind of like listening for the joints creaking when an insect walk right next to a 747 preparing to take off. (the scale might be wrong in this analogy).

But you are right, if we could design it properly, maybe we could get useful data from a desktop experiment. But this is the part where I get stuck.

Mark_T
03-06-2012, 10:59 PM
G (gravitational constant) can be measured (somewhat roughly) in a desktop experiment - you need dense masses and a sensitive torsion balance. Its also been measured using a mountain and a pendulum and some accurate star-sightings to measure the pendulum's deviation from local vertical.

wjsteele
03-07-2012, 11:04 AM
[SIZE=2]This cannot be accomplished without matter fabrication technologies (a.k.a. replicators)
but you can always contact DARPA for that technology.

Nah, not anymore... now MakerBot sells them! :-]

Bill

Humanoido
03-07-2012, 03:33 PM
These gravity waves are extremely important and may have led to the birth of our Universe. It seems black holes have a rush of material in the vortex that gravitationally develops a kind of wave that opens a mouth, with results that leads to the opening of another universe as a white hole. I believe this is how our Universe was born and these types of universes may be common. It may be likely the Big Bang was only the beginning of our Universe and not others, and others were born through their own big bangs from other universe' black holes. Some black hole in another universe gave birth to ours. We're finding out the cosmos is vastly larger than the human mind can imagine.

David B
03-07-2012, 09:31 PM
"We're finding out the cosmos is vastly larger than the human mind can imagine."

Wait - is it possible to imagine a thing larger than we can imagine? Something isn't right about that phrase.

Just kidding. This is a great topic.

I want to add a couple of references - frame-dragging, which suggests that on comparing gravity to the electric field, there is a corresponding gravito-magnetic field, and the LIGO experiment, which is trying to detect gravitational waves.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frame-dragging

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ligo

I met Ray Weiss of the LIGO project when I was in college, and asked him some dumb freshman question about gravity, and he laughed and said he gets the same question several times a year, but he was really nice about it.

I think there's much less to time than we think. Time is nothing more than the rate at which energy exchanges between fields - electric/magnetic, as in LC oscillators, or gravitational/gravi-magnetic, as in a pendulum, or the potential energy of an excited electron in an atom vs. the kinetic energy of the released photon, as in atomic clocks.

The rate of time is just another property at every point in space, sort of like temperature. The past and future are fiction; just figments of our imagination; nothing really exists but "now".

But why is it that both gravity-related fields seem to affect the rate of time but not both electromagnetic fields?

Humanoido
03-12-2012, 07:30 AM
Wait - is it possible to imagine a thing larger than we can imagine?We can imagine that things exist in which our minds are not sufficient to imagine all the details. So those things, even if our imagination is aware, it cannot fathom the consequences with such imagination. Take for example, time. At one time, it was said that time could only flow in the forward direction like water in a stream. Then that was proved to have exceptions based on time variances by gravity. We can imagine time going forward and backwards and we can imagine the time paradox but we are not aware of the details of the third condition of time altercations when time is neither flowing forward or backwards. You can compress, expand and slingshot time but in each of the cases where does it come from and where will it go?

Heater.
03-12-2012, 10:14 AM
Humanoid,


We're finding out the cosmos is vastly larger than the human mind can imagine.

I though we always imagined that. Err...now I've got headache:)


David B,

I don't follow. A "rate" is usually a measure of something per unit time. Like Speed = distance / time.

So your statement " Time is nothing more than the rate at which energy exchanges ...." read to me as "time = energy / time". Using time to define time does not help us and mixing up the units like that is not allowed anyway.

Then again your phrase "The rate of time is just another property ..." causes me issues. "rate of time" reads as time / time to me. What's that?

Of course then we have to introduce the idea that there are many different "times" depending on your speed /acceleration / gravitational situation. As laid out by Einstein and co. So we could talk about the rate at which yourTime passes compared to myTime say.

But that is getting mind bending complex already so "I think there's much less to time than we think" is unlikely.

Humanoido
03-12-2012, 11:39 AM
I think we could stick with the formula for time which was invented by Albert Einstein. The time factor is equal to one over the square root of one minus v squared over c squared, so we'll need to equate velocity, the speed of light, and time, at least with this formula. Yet Hawking has created a multi faceted time equation specifying black hole proximity so now we can use gravity as well. Indeed there are likely multiple dimensions of time, one for each universe, and one for each time zone in existing universes. Yet, there are some places where time has not begun and there is no time. If we look to the edge of our Universe, we see the zone of extinction where all time ceases to exist. Yet, beyond this zone, a bubble boundary is thought to exist, that encapsulates the time within our own Universe from that of other bubble universes. Can we see beyond this extinction zone? How can we see zones where no time exists? How is the curvature of the universe warped onto the boundary of time to no time? We are trying to use larger and larger telescopes to help answer some of these questions.

Humanoido
03-12-2012, 11:55 AM
Another even more startling aspect of time is the human equation. Some people are strapped for time while others definitely have too much time on their hands.

When we are one year old, half our life time is six months and one minute seems like an incredibly long time. By the time we are age 80, one year has less meaning in terms of time length and the rate of time passing by has physiologically accelerated to alarming speed, and days can be like hours. We could say the body slows down as clocks speed up.

Yet when we ponder the human life span, we live less than a fraction of a second in the grand scheme of the Cosmos. Our existence is everything, and yet our existence is microscopic. So time can enter into physics of gravitational waves and light, enter into the physiological aspect of a human's life span, and come into the cosmological scale of eternity.

lardom
03-12-2012, 05:45 PM
I'm zooming along in my rocketship which is traveling at roughly 1/5 the speed of light. A beam of light from behind passes me at 186,282.397 miles/hour. A second beam from the front passes my window at 186,282.397 miles/hour. An observer from a distant planet looks through a telescope and watches both light beams which from the observer's perspective, both take a long time to reach their destinations.
As far as the person in the rocketship is concerned I see it as "Access Denied". I won't defend this notion. It is my philosophical view.

wiretripper
03-12-2012, 06:07 PM
As far as traveling into the future all one would have to do is sustain in a higher gravity field relative to the one in which the "future" is in. Then when the "time" comes, equalize the the two fields for a sort of space-time sync. Of course this is assuming you are only looking to travel an adequate amount of time into the future and have taken into account the physical limitations on the human body and the surrounding environment in your endeavor. ;)


Lots of good analogies and thinking in this thread.
What is interesting and fascinating about gravity waves
is their ability to change time. As we know, the Earth
is a serious contender of gravity. Breaking the bonds
of Earth's gravity during a rocket launch requires
millions of tons of force. But what happens when we
examine a clock undergoing the effects Earth's gravity?

Not surprising, two clocks, one at the lowest point
and one at the highest point, with the greatest
gravity differential, will read different times.
That's because the clock experiencing more
gravity is experiencing time travel. So you only
need to generate an intense gravitational field to
experience a change in time.

Gravity waves could be generated artificially or
collected from space time. The best contender of
manipulating gravity is a black hole because they
come in different package sizes and theoretically
could be man made. Stand in front of one, and like
the different and separated clocks at the two points
on Earth, the gravity waves will change your
time, accelerating you into the future.

This is a way to time travel, without using
a space ship traveling at high speeds. So if we're
sort of lazy and don't want to build a "light speed"
star ship, we could position ourselves in front of a
huge gravity wave generator, like a black hole.

But how would you use the ability to travel into the
future? Time is fluid and like water flows in one
direction. As we know it, we can't go back in time,
though we can see back in time under special
conditions.

Using black holes again, we can see
ourselves existing moments in the past. How will
a super civilization use the technology of harnessing
gravity waves and bending, shaping the nuances
of space and time? Will they choose to live longer
and accelerate into the future? Will they observe the
past in different places of space time, i.e. at the front
of a modulating worm hole, through time portals?
How will the technology of harnessing gravity waves
shape our future lives?

Humanoido
03-12-2012, 06:26 PM
As far as traveling into the future all one would have to do is sustain in a higher gravity field relative to the one in which the "future" is in. Then when the "time" comes, equalize the the two fields for a sort of space-time sync. Of course this is assuming you are only looking to travel an adequate amount of time into the future and have taken into account the physical limitations on the human body and the surrounding environment in your endeavor. ;)I like the idea of syncing with a time traveling reference space time frame and there is great merit in adjusting the gravitational field. I designed a harmonic gravitational time machine. It had only one minor bug. The intensity of the harmonics would tear apart the human riding it. So I was looking for a gravitometric shielding for the human. Unfortunately Star Trek was canceled and I don't know how they solved the shielding problem. I think it has 2 solutions, one is fitting through the gravity wave crests and peaks and two is related to antimatter and antigravity. If anyone solves this I would be interested.

Humanoido
03-13-2012, 08:15 AM
I'm zooming along in my rocketship which is traveling at roughly 1/5 the speed of light. A beam of light from behind passes me at 186,282.397 miles/hour. A second beam from the front passes my window at 186,282.397 miles/hour. An observer from a distant planet looks through a telescope and watches both light beams which from the observer's perspective, both take a long time to reach their destinations. As far as the person in the rocketship is concerned I see it as "Access Denied". I won't defend this notion. It is my philosophical view.Depending on the inertial reference frame of the observer, the light could take a theoretical 13.7 billion years to reach destination (a long time). One could perform an experiment on Earth, using observations from Superluminal motion objects.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superluminal_motion

In astronomy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomy), superluminal motion is the apparently faster-than-light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light) motion seen in some radio galaxies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_galaxy), quasars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasar) and recently also in some galactic sources called microquasars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microquasar). All of these sources are thought to contain a black hole (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_hole), responsible for the ejection of mass at high velocities.