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Ron Czapala
02-14-2012, 04:51 PM
Looking for a totally cool RC helicopter toy (http://www.tecca.com/topic/toys/) that's perfect for kids and kids at heart? Then check out the innovative new Force Flyer that's controlled, literally, by a wave of the hand.

To pilot the Force Flyer, you need to first strap a wearable control pad onto your arm. You use your thumb to control the speed of the helicopter's rotors and thus the helicopter's height. Turning your hand in either direction tells the helicopter to turn in that same direction using the glove's built-in accelerometer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerometer) similar to that in a Wii (http://www.tecca.com/platform/wii/) remote.
The crash-resilient helicopter comes with a battery that you can recharge via USB. Unfortunately, you only get about 10 minutes of play time out of a full 20 minute charge barely enough for a child with a short attention span.
Supposedly, these little Force Flyer helicopters have been built to last. Tech journalists have been doing nothing but crashing the things all week long, and they're still buzzing.
Force Flyers will be hitting store shelves in May. The smaller, indoor version of the Force Flyer will retail for $50; the larger, outdoor version will retail $100.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8b0cAKvhBYI

Duane Degn
02-15-2012, 03:15 PM
I hacked a four channel Spektrum remote to receive signals from a Prop. The Prop then reads a Wii Nunchuck and use the input to control the helicopter.

I usually use the Nunchuck's joystick for pitch (elevator) and roll (ailerons) control. The accelerometer controls throttle and yaw (rudder).

So far, I've only used it to fly the small Blade mCX and mSR helicopters but it could also control larger helicopters and airplanes.

I'm pretty sure the helicopters in the video are 3-channel helicopters. They can't fly sideways. Whenever you see a helicopter with the tail rotor pointing up, it's probably a 3-channel helicopter.