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View Full Version : Bluetooth Audio Receiver as an Android link for projects?



WBA Consulting
01-20-2012, 06:38 PM
I stumbled across this Bluetooth Audio Receiver at Parts Express (http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=320-352) and had a few ideas pop into my head. Could this be used as a simple one way communication device for a Propeller or STAMP project from an Android based phone using a simple DTMF app, morse code APP, or other audio generating app?

Android Phone--->Music Player App--->WAV file with "beep-bop-beep" tone--->~~~Bluetooth Headphone link~~~>BT-1 Receiver--->Audio Signal via stereo jack--->Propeller/Stamp


Couldn't you create a WAV file to play with your phone that is just a set of tones that get transmitted to these "bluetooth headphones" which are then interpreted by the Propeller/STAMP as a unique command?

Device connections are very simple: VCC (3.3 or 5V), GND, AudioOutLeft, AudioOutRight, and AudioOutGnd.

88766

Heater.
01-20-2012, 09:20 PM
This whole Android phone/tab thing is starting to drive me nuts. Just now I'm trying to type this on a Samsung Gallaxy tab and it's as slow as hell. I mean multiple secondsbetween hitting a key and anything happening on screen. No 8 bit CP/M editor was ever so slow and in flexible.
Then on top of that how do I connect it to anything, like my Props for example? Not even a serial port here or a USB to use as a serial port.
So here come the audio and blue tooth audio and a bunch of other cludges to do anything simple .
Bah I despair. Give me a Beagle board or Raspberrypi and debian any time.

jazzed
01-20-2012, 09:49 PM
This whole Android phone/tab thing is starting to drive me nuts. Just now I'm trying to type this on a Samsung Gallaxy tab and it's as slow as hell. I mean multiple secondsbetween hitting a key and anything happening on screen. ...

Yep. This is why a graphical programming environment is necessary for such tablets.
Many tablets have blue-tooth for outside world stuff such as keyboards and com ports.

Mickster
01-20-2012, 09:51 PM
Wow I think there is definitely a problem with that particular Galaxy!

Having nothing but fun here with the Toshiba Thrive coupled to a micro-controller via a BT-RS232 adapter. The serial comm's library provided by the Basic4Android guys is rock-solid and the string handling of this BASIC dialect, although different, makes programming an Android device very painless.

I only just realized that BT is way more than a link between a hand-held device and a headset. The industrial guys have or are about to introduce industrial Emergency-Stop systems that are 100% BT!

Mickster

Cluso99
01-21-2012, 12:32 AM
I have the same problem with my xoom. I can type many chars in advance and then wait for seconds to see each character displayed. IIRC it was not always that slow. I have only downloaded a few apps. Android certainly has a bit of work to do to get to maintime use - I am sure iPad is not this bad.

$WMc%
01-21-2012, 01:19 AM
@Mickster--
'
What programing software are you using that offers BASIC?
'
I'm using Java "sun" with eclipse "classic" and a dozen or more Android plug-ins.This is "C" inside of java.
I'd much rather use BASIC than C.
'
'
@Heater--
My Android Nexus 4G is ballistic.
The text editor displays the word I'm typing before I can finish typing it on a bar just above the text window.It also auto caps and spell checks!
There maybe something wrong with your Galaxy.
'
I'm working on an Android WiFi app now that will talk to an RN-174 that will replace an RF unit on my Prop project.
'
I haven't tried any BT stuff yet,But it sounds promising.
'
I can see a great deal of stuff being controlled from a smart phone in the not to distant future.

WBA Consulting
01-21-2012, 07:52 AM
Both my Nook Color and Motorola Droid X2 are phenomenal in regards to performance of their respective purposes. My DroidX2 is always a step ahead of my typing but I don't take advantage of the autocomplete because I like to let my fingers finish my thought. Sorry if you are dissatisfied with an Android device, but that's not my point.

@Heater, yes, it may be a kludge method of using Bluetooth for communication with an Android device, but the point is that almost all phones that play music can be paired with a Bluetooth set of headphones. So, in essence, even a basic cellphone could be used to communicate to a microcontroller project. An Android based phone provides much greater flexibility, but this Bluetooth module gives yet another method to accomplish a project.

@Mickster, I agree with the Bluetooth usage in industrial applications because I have also seen Bluetooth being utilized in equipment used in PCB manufacturing. At last year's APEX show, one machine used Bluetooth to communicate to the head unit because the gantry was fluid based and the head electronics ran on an internal battery pack (charged via spring contacts when the head parked). This module made me think of some different ways to use Bluetooth because it is one-way whereas I always thought of Bluetooth as two-way communication. I checked out Basic4Android (http://www.basic4ppc.com) and will definitely look at it more. Looks like the VB experience I have from making powerful macros in Excel could be beneficial with it.

Mickster
01-21-2012, 10:22 PM
@Mickster--
'
What programing software are you using that offers BASIC?
'
I'm using Java "sun" with eclipse "classic" and a dozen or more Android plug-ins.This is "C" inside of java.
I'd much rather use BASIC than C.


As per Andrew's link, it's Basic4Android. Just as I consider my Windows programming "secret weapon" to be www.PowerBASIC.com (http://www.PowerBASIC.com) I see this as the Android programmer's equivalent. Dr_Acula first mentioned it in another thread regarding the Android controlled iOiO, I think it was.

Anyway, I recommend you download their trial and their "Beginners Guide" and check out their libraries. You know, when I first started to experiment with BT comm's between an Android device and my machine controller (equipped with a BT-RS232 adapter), I simply downloaded a few different terminal emulators from the Android Market and was not impressed at all. The demo routines provided by B4A worked flawlessly. Dr_Acula unwittingly just changed the direction of our developments :)

Regards,

Mickster