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View Full Version : 31-digit (not bit) computation of a 7th-order polynomial in four clock cycles p



Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)
12-11-2009, 04:10 PM
www.youtube.com/watch?v=0anIyVGeWOI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0anIyVGeWOI)

And we all thought the Propeller was fast!

-Phil

Toby Seckshund
12-11-2009, 04:39 PM
Like so many of those great inventions, it was such a great shame that he died before seeing the machine finished.

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Style and grace : Nil point

Clock Loop
12-11-2009, 04:39 PM
Someone needs to hook up a jet engine to that thing and see what kinda numbers it can churn out.

Leon
12-11-2009, 07:52 PM
Babbage's later Analytical Engine was more like a modern computer:

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/objects/computing_and_data_processing/1878-3.aspx (http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/objects/computing_and_data_processing/1878-3.aspx)

Leon

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Amateur radio callsign: G1HSM

Post Edited (Leon) : 12/11/2009 11:58:03 AM GMT

mikestefoy
12-11-2009, 08:08 PM
It would seem that the Englishmen invented almost everything.

why oh why are we so fantastic http://forums.parallax.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Graham Stabler
12-11-2009, 08:12 PM
What a wonderful machine, a fantastic idea implemented beautifully and so practical, I was so surprised to find it that it not only printed the results but produced plates for tables.

The explanation was also really nicely done, great to see the guy given time to explain it at least to some degree rather than chopped up and edited to death.

Graham

ElectricAye
12-11-2009, 10:08 PM
So, assuming friction is not an issue, if you had 100 billion of those machines all hooked together and a water wheel cranking the gears, would it ever achieve self awareness? Would it ever experience the color blue or groove to U2?




mikestefoy said...
It would seem that the Englishmen invented almost everything.

why oh why are we so fantastic http://forums.parallax.com/images/smilies/smile.gif


Right. Ask a Brit who invented X and he will say a Brit did. Ask a Frenchman, and he will say French. Ask an American and guess what.
If you ask an archeologist who invented "everything", there's a good chance she'll tell you the Chinese did. The only thing they never invented was good government, I think, and so a whole heap of their past accomplishments has ended up in the dust.

rjo_
12-11-2009, 10:28 PM
Phil...

I don't know where it is... but if you look around for it, I'm sure you'll find it. There is an Italian paper from that period... which is available as translated source material. In that paper Babbage's math is explained... and if the paper is correct, then in the original math, Babbage made an error. Possibly he didn't finish the machine, because he didn't know exactly what he was doing. It is very possible that Ada Lovelace is the one who found Babbage's mistake... and basically covered it up. The differences between the math as presented in the paper and the final incarnation of the machine are very subtle but very important.

Fascinating period...

For new people to the forum... I have posted a prime number generator that could be made into a Babbage type mechanical device. I'm sure the history department at Parallax can point you to it... I lost the link a long time ago and can't find the code:)



Rich

ElectricAye
12-11-2009, 10:50 PM
rjo_ said...
....Possibly he didn't finish the machine, because he didn't know exactly what he was doing. ....


What caught my eye at 1:52 is the cam stack. If the whole idea was to eliminate human error, well.... who machined those cams? And to what tolerances? And how well aligned are they? And how well do they wear and... and... and...

Ah, that old demon Error.... ((sigh)) can't live with him.... can't live without him.

I wonder how well the thing works in reality.



http://forums.parallax.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Graham Stabler
12-11-2009, 11:31 PM
ElectricAye said...

rjo_ said...
....Possibly he didn't finish the machine, because he didn't know exactly what he was doing. ....


What caught my eye at 1:52 is the cam stack. If the whole idea was to eliminate human error, well.... who machined those cams? And to what tolerances? And how well aligned are they? And how well do they wear and... and... and...

Ah, that old demon Error.... ((sigh)) can't live with him.... can't live without him.

I wonder how well the thing works in reality.

http://forums.parallax.com/images/smilies/smile.gif


I don't think the cams need to be especially accurate as they are not performing analogue computing, they could probably be stepped but that would sound and look awful.

Interesting you mention tolerances etc, another British invention I think :)

Graham

Phil Pilgrim (PhiPi)
12-12-2009, 12:09 AM
_rjo said...
Fascinating period...

I think it must have been a frustrating period in which to live. There were so many new ideas afoot, yet the reach of many who spawned those ideas exceeded their grasp for lack of the technology to incarnate them. Babbage was in just that predicament. The designs he imagined and detailed could never be realized with the then-extant state of the art in metalworking. Even with today's technology (and Nathan Myhrvold's Microsoft millions), it took 17 years and five tons (or tonnes — not sure which) of metal to construct Babbage's difference engine.

-Phil

heater
12-12-2009, 12:11 AM
The Propeller should be able to emulate that almost as fast as the original.
How many cogs did it use again?

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For me, the past is not over yet.

mikestefoy
12-12-2009, 12:36 AM
@ElectricAye

"Right. Ask a Brit who invented X and he will say a Brit did. Ask a Frenchman, and he will say French. Ask an American and guess what.
If you ask an archeologist who invented "everything", there's a good chance she'll tell you the Chinese did. The only thing they never invented was good government, I think, and so a whole heap of their past accomplishments has ended up in the dust."

I guess yo aint European.

I am English not a Brit (a dirty word nowadays)

The Scots had James Clerk Maxwell, who I admit was a giant

I live in France, and love them for their character, and would never doubt their cooking.

The Chinese invented Gunpowder, for sure.

The Americans invented Coca Cola, McDonalds, and KFC, and the H bomb.


also, the English invented humour,

just joking in all of this. I just love winding people up

Mike

heater
12-12-2009, 01:01 AM
How come the world had to wait for a Canadian to invent a binary adding machine that can be built out of wood and marbles?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcDshWmhF4A (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcDshWmhF4A)

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For me, the past is not over yet.